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BeLiAL124

Building a PC for Solidworks

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I completed the build and it turned out awesome, everything has been running stable so far.  I am not going to do any stress testing because he doesn't want me to.

The cpu is hovering around 30C idle in a 72 degreeF room with the Phanteks cooler..

 

The only thing that raised my eyebrow was the temp of the titan Black during Unigine Valley, 83C

My GTX 770 runs 60C on valley, but IMO has a lot better cooler with the 3X windforce.

 

Valley score was 2900 on ULTRA HD with all setting's to default in the UEFI.  

 

 

 

 

I am trying to remember if I need to make any important changes in the UEFI, other than boot priority and getting the ram timings set...?

I built my pc a year ago a bit fuzzy now..

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Deactivate every controller u arn't using (additional SATA like Asmedia or Marvel, LANports, onboard sound, ...), also BS like "Wake on LAN" can often be deactivated.

 

AC-loss I set on power-off usually, so that I stand a higher chance noticing, if things go "hoppla" during absence.

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My GTX660 SC runs at similar temps in ugine, its a closed gpu with 1 fan right? That would be why i guess.

How many case fans you got?

 

edit: yep, 80C for my 660 after running a benchmark.

 

got a score of 1780 on ultra.

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So I got a copy of Solidworks to test, all I can say is wow..this software is amazing.

 

Taking square to round transitions and projecting them to a flat pattern for the waterjet to cut in one click...can save as dxf and it even color codes the bend lines! :)

 

 

I was able to take a large 3d assembly I made and put it to a factory background and render it in a photo realistic image..pushes the CPU to 100% but renders quickly.

52C was the hottest I got the CPU with my real world testing.  I'm happy.

 

I am running the i7 5960X at the stock clock speeds, this thing's fast!

I wonder how many FPS this system would get gaming..i'll never know lol it's strictly for work.

 

Now all I have to do is learn the ins and outs..then teach my boss everything LOL..

It's his software but he doesn't have time to learn it all, so I have to teach him. 

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You might want to go with a Nividia Quattro K2200 or something up the line according to your price range. If his old machine could hold up until now and the K2200 is probably enough. Prices get rather silly if you go higher.

http://www.nvidia.de/object/quadro-desktop-gpu-specs-de.html

Our CAD guy always complained about graphic glitches with his old machine and I got him a new one. As I had no clue what graphics card I'd need for a dedicated CAD machine I contacted Solidworks support directly. Turns out you actually want one of those to have 100% up to date drivers. Because that's what the guys at Solid Works are running. They don't recommend using gaming cards for real work (multi layered complex constructions with up to hundreds or thousands of parts)

We ran a test and loaded up the most complex design we had available. Very noticeable improvements in loading time, responsiveness and FPS while stuff is in motion. Graphic glitches are gone too. Not claiming to know what I'm doing just giving you a reference from someone who was in a similar situation. 

The machine ended up costing a bit over 3k Eurobucks as far as I remember.

If in doubt i can recommend calling Solid Works and asking for help.

no clue where I misclicked to end up in a thread half a year old ... sorry my bad.

Edited by Teslarod

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