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I decided to delid my 6700K

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I've been running my i7-6700K overclocked at 4.6 GHz since shortly after I installed the CPU and motherboard in my PC.  My 6700K has been cooled by a Corsair H100i V2 AIO liquid cooler for over a year.  I noticed that my i7 6700K's temperatures seemed to be a bit higher than they use to be while gaming.  The CPU temperatures were a lot higher than they use to be while running benchmarks.  I heard that Intel's' stock TIM(Thermal Interface Material) between the CPU die and the heat spreader can lose some of its ability to transfer heat over time, especially on overclocked CPUs.  So, I ordered the Rockit88 Delid/relid Tool and some CoolLab Liquid Pro.

https://rockitcool.myshopify.com/products/rockit-88

While I was waiting for the tool and Liquid Pro to arrive, I ran both the Intel Burn Test v2.54 on the Very High setting for 10 runs and Prime95 v28.9 for 30 minutes and recorded the max temperatures.  I used Prime95 2.89 because I read its more CPU intensive and gives higher temperatures than earlier and later versions of the program.

The delid tool arrived a few business days later.  I followed the instructions in the video on the Rockit88 web page and my IHS(Integrated Heat Spreader) popped right off using the tool.  Some cleaning with rubbing alcohol and my fingernail and the IHS and CPU were clean and fre of the stock TIM and black adhesive.  I applied the Liquid Pro to the CPU and the bottom side of the IHS and put a very thin line of black high temp RTV on all edges of the IHS and a small dot of superglue in each corner.  I used the relid tool to reattach the IHS to the CPU and held it in place for 15 minutes before putting the CPU back in the motherboard.

I recorded some maximum temperature results with the same benchmarks that day.  Then I waited 2 days later and repeated the benchmarks again recording the maximum temperature.  When I ran the benchmarks again 2 days later, the room temperature was about 2-3 degrees C higher than it was the day I did the delidding/relidding.  I should have recorded temperature difference over ambient temperature, but I didn't think about that until later.

These were the results:

n1Fbumu.jpg

As you can see, the results with the Intel Burn Test were a difference of 21-23 degrees C.  The Results with Prime 95 28.9 were 12-15 Degrees C.  Idle temperatures are also about 3 Degrees C cooler.  Overall, I'm happy with the results.  I'll have to see if I can overclock the CPU at a higher speed now also.  

At first, I wondered why Intel doesn't use better TIM on the K series CPUs.  Then I remembered reading  that K series CPUs are less than 0.5% of Intel's desktop PC CPU sales and setting up a separate production line to attach the IHS to the die probably isn't financially worth it for Intel.  Also, I read that Intel gets tax breaks in some countries for using TIM over solder because its a more environmentally friendly manufacturing process.  The TIM probably doesn't cause enough problems for enough K series CPU users to make Intel spend the money to change their process.

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Fyi for thermal testing you should be using P95 26.6.

TDP can be pushed higher than normal if you've set auto or adaptive vcore on... which could potentially cause problems down the road.

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1 hour ago, Bavor said:

At first, I wondered why Intel doesn't use better TIM on the K series CPUs.  Then I remembered reading  that K series CPUs are less than 0.5% of Intel's desktop PC CPU sales and setting up a separate production line to attach the IHS to the die probably isn't financially worth it for Intel.  Also, I read that Intel gets tax breaks in some countries for using TIM over solder because its a more environmentally friendly manufacturing process.  The TIM probably doesn't cause enough problems for enough K series CPU users to make Intel spend the money to change their process.

This may be true now but 4770K had serious issues with overheating. They done 2600K/3770K there is no reason to continue this practice on top of the line chips. But they are greedy twats without competition so we get shitty plastic instead of real stuff.

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1) Coolaboratory Liquid Pro is the only LM that hardens over time - you don't wan't that! Delid again and use Thermal Grizzly or Coolaboratory Ultra, both don't get hard.

2)

 

Unbenannt.jpg

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8 hours ago, Fulcrous said:

Fyi for thermal testing you should be using P95 26.6.

I wonder why 26.6 is recommended for thermal testing when the max temperatures are 3-5 degrees C lower than with 28.9.  I tried  26.6 on three PCs and all of them had consistently lower max temperatures than 28.9

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5 hours ago, Folterknecht said:

1) Coolaboratory Liquid Pro is the only LM that hardens over time - you don't wan't that! Delid again and use Thermal Grizzly or Coolaboratory Ultra, both don't get hard.

I seem to have found conflicting info on that.  There are people who have overclocked and delidded 3770ks and 4770Ks who used Liquid Pro and they aren't having higher temperatures after 24-36 months while other people have had higher temperatures with Liquid Pro after 6-12 months.  It seems that the people who reattached the IHS to the CPU with some sort of adhesive had much longer periods of time before the temperatures rose when using Liquid Pro

I've also seen plenty of photos and videos of Liquid Ultra hardening and becoming less effective in 12 months of use.  Liquid Pro is not the only one that hardens over time.  Liquid Ultra does it also.

At this point I'm wondering if its either user error in not cleaning effectively or it has something to do with not attaching the IHS to the CPU with some sort of sealant or adhesive.

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2 hours ago, Bavor said:

I seem to have found conflicting info on that.  There are people who have overclocked and delidded 3770ks and 4770Ks who used Liquid Pro and they aren't having higher temperatures after 24-36 months while other people have had higher temperatures with Liquid Pro after 6-12 months.  It seems that the people who reattached the IHS to the CPU with some sort of adhesive had much longer periods of time before the temperatures rose when using Liquid Pro

I've also seen plenty of photos and videos of Liquid Ultra hardening and becoming less effective in 12 months of use.  Liquid Pro is not the only one that hardens over time.  Liquid Ultra does it also.

At this point I'm wondering if its either user error in not cleaning effectively or it has something to do with not attaching the IHS to the CPU with some sort of sealant or adhesive.

Well Thermal Grizzly doesn't get hard ... regardless of the other two LMs.

Did you isolate the contacts near the DIE?

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6 hours ago, Bavor said:

I've also seen plenty of photos and videos of Liquid Ultra hardening and becoming less effective in 12 months of use.  Liquid Pro is not the only one that hardens over time.  Liquid Ultra does it also.

You just reapply paste after some time...

 

Also isn’t Liquid Pro abrasives thermal paste? 

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CLU doesn't harden between the IHS and die but it does harden between the IHS and your CPU block or heatsink or whatever you have on top.

And there is no reason to cover anything on the CPUs as it won't spill over unless you manage to apply too much of it like a bot somehow.

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5 hours ago, Folterknecht said:

Did you isolate the contacts near the DIE?

The 6700K has no contacts on top near the die.

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