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NavySnipers

Navy's list of things to think about for new PC builders.

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Make sure you have plenty of cooling so you can overclock it to be able to run Tanks at 20 FPS.

 

BF3 on Ultra? 50 fps

 

WoT on Max?.....40 fps......GG WG.

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6. UEFI bios best bios. I didn't really even need to do anything except make sure the boot priority was correct.

 

 

UEFI isn't BIOS. Functionally, they perform similar tasks, but they're not the same thing. UEFI has has its own set of drawbacks too. :(

 

 

5. Don't accidently power up the motherboard when the CPU is installed and the CPU cooler isn't.  You'll let the magic smoke out and rage like you have never raged before...

 

While it's not recommended to test how quick the thermal sensors will trip, any CPU made within the last ~8 years will shut down before any damage is done. 

 

 

Of course, my only point was against spreading the thermal paste. According to the link, it's ony a suggested technique for laptop CPU's, for everything else they recommend the vertical line method (best method).

 

Vertical line is only recommended on Intel processors. For AMD, it's either spread or middle dot. This is per the ArticSilver link you're referencing. 

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Vertical line is only recommended on Intel processors. For AMD, it's either spread or middle dot. This is per the ArticSilver link you're referencing. 

 

Yes, we were talking about the link. Vertical line works best for Intel because of how the cores are positioned.

Still, I never would recommend spreading, doesn't matter what CPU. As I said, letting the cooler's weight and pressure will ensure a more uniform spread than manually spreading it, aside from preventing problems with air bubbles.

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Yes, we were talking about the link. Vertical line works best for Intel because of how the cores are positioned.

Still, I never would recommend spreading, doesn't matter what CPU. As I said, letting the cooler's weight and pressure will ensure a more uniform spread than manually spreading it, aside from preventing problems with air bubbles.

 

Since you have easy access to the info, tracert or whois the IP I'm posting from. ;) I have a pretty solid idea of Intel's layout. 

I'm simply pointing out that vertical line is not recommended for everything like you mentioned. AMD still exists, and vertical line isn't the way to go for AMD.

Realistically, the difference you'll see between a vertical line and small dot press are minute. Thankfully, most folks around here like to min/max the hell out of things. 

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Since you have easy access to the info, tracert or whois the IP I'm posting from. ;) I have a pretty solid idea of Intel's layout. 

I'm simply pointing out that vertical line is not recommended for everything like you mentioned. AMD still exists, and vertical line isn't the way to go for AMD.

Realistically, the difference you'll see between a vertical line and small dot press are minute. Thankfully, most folks around here like to min/max the hell out of things. 

 

I never said it's recommended for everything. If you go back and look at my posts, the only thing I said was to let the heatsink spread the thermal paste, and I never suggested an application method. The first time I mentioned the vertical line was pointing out what the link Getsome posted said...

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I never said it's recommended for everything. If you go back and look at my posts, the only thing I said was to let the heatsink spread the thermal paste, and I never suggested an application method. The first time I mentioned the vertical line was pointing out what the link Getsome posted said...

 

 

 

See bolded below. 

 

Of course, my only point was against spreading the thermal paste. According to the link, it's ony a suggested technique for laptop CPU's, for everything else they recommend the vertical line method (best method).

 

 

 

...or, since I can't bold your quote, see the part that says " for everything else they recommend the vertical line method (best method)."

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See bolded below. 

 
 

 

 

...or, since I can't bold your quote, see the part that says " for everything else they recommend the vertical line method (best method)."

 

"They" being the key word here

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"They" being the key word here

 

 

Click the ArticSilver link to TIM application recommendations. 

 

Click "AMD".

 

"They", the do not recommend vertical line for everything. In fact, "they" specifically say on the AMD portion that "they" only recommend two methods for AMD chips. If you look at the list, you'll notice the two recommended methods are dot and surface spread. 

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Click the ArticSilver link to TIM application recommendations. 

 

Click "AMD".

 

"They", the do not recommend vertical line for everything. In fact, "they" specifically say on the AMD portion that "they" only recommend two methods for AMD chips. If you look at the list, you'll notice the two recommended methods are dot and surface spread. 

 

Fair enough, to be honest I searched it on Google when I made that post and the only thing I found was the Intel link, I never even knew they had information for AMD.

 

Again, I'm not trying to say Vertical Line is the best method for every CPU. The only, ONLY point I'm trying to make is against spreading. Jesus.

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Fair enough, to be honest I searched it on Google when I made that post and the only thing I found was the Intel link, I never even knew they had information for AMD.

 

Again, I'm not trying to say Vertical Line is the best method for every CPU. The only, ONLY point I'm trying to make is against spreading. Jesus.

 

 

BestBrews_BeerToast.jpg

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Things not to do when working on your computer.  

 

Last week I was working on an old PC.  I took the cover off and saw all the dust. No problem. Time to get out the compressed air.

 

I started to spray the compressed air inside the case and said "WTF why is it so dark?"  Is that some sort of weird reaction to the temperature (as it can be really cold right?)

I tried to spray it at a piece of paper and realized... Oh crap.  That's black.  That's not compressed air.  I looked at the can. Oh crap. That is a can of spray paint!

 

I picked up the wrong can and sprayed black spray paint on the PCI cards I was trying to clean off. LOL.

 

BTW - working fine. No problems so far, but scared to leave it on too long as a fire hazard. 

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Personally I recommend all New PC Builders go straight to liquid cooling and overclocking.

 

/sarcasm

 

I tried over-clocking when I was a poor student and couldn't afford anything decent :-)

 

I don't bother with my current machine :-)

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I tried over-clocking when I was a poor student and couldn't afford anything decent :-)

 

I don't bother with my current machine :-)

 

I didn't overclock my current rig from the get go.  At the time it was running anything I wanted to play fine so I saw no need to put extra stress on the CPU.  More recently I upgraded the GPU and overclocked the CPU from 2.6Ghz to ~4.1Ghz.  Until Intel releases new chips I'm close enough to what I could get out of a new i5 that it's just not worth the upgrade.  I'll probably build a new machine when Star Citizen comes out and take the same approach.  If I hadn't been able to get a decent OC out of it I would probably be looking to build a new one right now.

 

TL;DR: Sometimes a decent OC can let you hold off on upgrading longer, and if you're not happy with the current performance anyway there's no reason not to try.

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Thread pinned.

 

Since the thread is for first time PC bulders, here's a bit of PC builder superstition:

 

After you finish building your computer and you're ready to power it on for the first time, DO NOT put the sidepanels back on before you turn it on. Putting the sidepanels back on before turning it on for the first time after completed is a signal of aggresion and defiance towards the PC Building Gods, and they WILL make something go wrong on your computer and force you to open it all up and check everything.

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Forgot to mention this: Make a pcpartspicker list of all you components so that you don't forget them in the future.

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Water cooling is expensive and it's neither silent nor better by default. If you buy a cheap (bad) water cooling system you will still need fans, lots of them actually.

You need a few good fans for cooling the radiator, and you need fans inside your case to keep the air circulating. All the components inside the case generate heat that needs to be "thrown out".

You also need to remember that most CPU air coolers not only cool the CPU chip, but also the motherboards voltage regulation module aka VRM. If there is no, or little airflow over the VRM coolers then you will need to provide it by installing custom air coolers or better, larger passive cooling.

If you want to cool your graphics card with water, then you need to buy a full cover water block that goes over the entire card. Small blocks that cover only the GPU chip are bad and even dangerous, because you risk burning the cards voltage regulation.

 

 

 

Don't do this:

 

28s1zb9.jpg

 

It's stupid if you ask me. It's expensive but pointless. A good air cooler would be better than that silly water cooling system, and it would be cheaper and quieter.

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If you're going to be working on your own computer.  You should get one of these little holders that retired people put all their vitamins/medications in.

 

511_thumbnail_image.jpg

 

It is a great way to organize all the little screws you use when you are working on your PC.

 

Also a little pc toolkit with micro sized screw drivers, hex heads, etc.  It doesn't have to be one of those fancy 107 piece toolkits.  It just needs to have the little micro sized screwdrivers and such.

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When installing fans on your case, be sure to have more intake fans than exhausts. This creates positive air pressure inside the case and forces the air out of every opening. This helps keep dust outside the computer and prevents hot air that is exhausted from being sucked back into the case.

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When installing fans on your case, be sure to have more intake fans than exhausts. This creates positive air pressure inside the case and forces the air out of every opening. This helps keep dust outside the computer and prevents hot air that is exhausted from being sucked back into the case.

 

Definitely a good call.  Dust seems to collect really quickly in my place, so switching a few of the fans was crucial to keep it out of my case.  Works really well, though I do go in every so often with a can of air just to make sure.

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