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kolni

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  1. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from mistervanni in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
  2. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Snoregasm2 in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    Depends on what you want to learn, sounds like a douchy answer but it's kind of important as you pick up different things from different vehicles. Your experiences and subjective playstyle also mean you pick up different things than other people will from the same situations. Start off with if you want to get better at a gameplay element or just a specific tank. The first is much more useful as you can apply those to many more tanks but they don't come with experience as you often have to actively play towards your goal to learn from it rather than focusing on playing as well as possible which is something that very many have trouble letting go of (myself included). 
    Autoloaders for example gives you a lot of practice playing as the center of attention, as you deal burst damage people focus you and that focus is exactly what you can take with you and apply to other tanks as well, having 1k autoloader games banked will end up mattering when you're playing as a top tier single shooter in a 357, again as the center of attention, especially with multiple arties. This should help connect the dots that you can learn something elsewhere than where you want to apply it. 357MM as top tier is much more rare and doesn't let you practice controlling the game very often, but you can spam autoloaders days on end and practice this specific thing for as long as you want, and then apply it to the tank you feel just gets too much focus for you to play well. OP tanks tend to get more focus, so this is what I did to bypass that problem and get better. You'll also pick up other things meanwhile practicing specifics, and don't pidgeon hole yourself into only that specific thing but remaining aware of the other positives you experienced during the practice of what you want to improve to speed up these processes. 
    This is not the only things autoloaders are good for when it comes to practice, but it's one that is hard to practice anywhere else. As I previously mentioned you want a comfortable practice environment that generally means going down tiers to simplify gameplay to get good practice. Good practice doesn't mean easy games though, you don't learn from easy games. You want to be challenged but still be in control. That's a thin line to walk but where you're going to learn the most. You want as many of your games as possible to be fruitful for the future, which is different from playing for performance. Performance means no risk-taking, but learning generally means the opposite as you want to expand your options and as a result will end up being having to try new things and see what works. This is a lot of stupid dying and derpy games, but that is fine as long as you take something from them. Just remember to toggle this off once you feel comfortable with the topic you decided to practice though and go back to risk-averse gameplay with your newly refined skillset. The thing is you want to get a feel of what is actually a risk and what is not and you don't really get to that point without testing your limits.
    Risk-averse mean something entirely different for a 50% player and me. Playing passive in my eyes would still be considered aggressive to most players because they don't know that the decisions I'm making have sound reasoning behind them and thus less risky to make than meets the eye, they are totally safe because I ran the numbers before making it. So risk is  percieved as subjective, and you want to make it as objective as possible meaning you want information and really nurture your ability to interpret the information. There are many "close calls" that were nothing of the kind, and there were also situations where I really fucked up but no one was aware enough to catch my mistake. When that happens I try my best to recognise them as mistakes still, it's hard but mistakes usually don't go unpunished in tier 10 so remembering it for next time has generally been a net positive over letting them go for the sake of my ego. 
    Start off with figuring out one of your bigger issues in gameplay for a certain tank. Try to figure out a setting that makes you practice this, whether it's something simple to work on like dying less or more nuanced like getting better at reading enemy intentions etc is totally up to you. The important thing is to determine a gameplay aspect that could use improvement and simply doing something towards that goal as you play. 
    If DPG or stats is of any concern then you want to limit test in a different tank than the one you want to improve, I couldn't care less about my service record so I generally just spam the tank I want to get better at directly. I rarely practice specifics like above anymore as I tend to focus on the specific tank for a pretty substantial period of time if my performance isn't what I want it to be yet instead. (M60 would be a good example, I was nowhere close to 3marking it at the start but after 500 games or so I had the highest average on the server by like 900 for the last 50 of them because I just stuck to it and really got the playstyle locked down on every single map, starting at sub 4k DPG for first 50 and 5,8k for the 50 at the end which is a HUGE difference considering it actually had very little to do with good/bad sessions).
    This is probably because I tend to pick these things up by sheer game quantity over quality practice. I don't really practice in that way anymore because when I do end up playing again I tend to have a specific goal in mind and only playing towards that. (Generally a T10 reward tank 3MoE or DPG challenge). I tend to stick to one tank until I am satisfied and that's what works for me right now with how often I play the game these days. Doesn't really matter what tank in the end, go through your replays if you're struggling to find what you're doing wrong and inspect them until you find a lapse in judgement, be more precise and nitpicky as you get further into this and you'll eventually find yourself becoming a better player.
  3. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Snoregasm2 in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    i really can’t stress enough how valuable track shots are for farming, not just for you but your teammates as well - if the enemy can’t move they can’t get safe and cannot fight on their terms which is always what you want to be doing, even in autoloaders i spam trackshots despite risking not damaging a shot for either burning their repkit or keeping them in place in a position where they are farmable. that’s where you want to keep your enemies ideally, keep them in the sweet spot where you can fight them but they can’t push you
    you also seem to value staying alive over impacting the game a tad too much, this is not a habit i would remove though, all it needs is a slight adjustment (staying alive is still a super important aspect and should be valued very highly) so i would advise you to try more things out - as you’re returning from a long break the mechanics come back eventually but you want to get as deep into the meta-read ASAP meaning you’re going to have to try stuff and test limits on what works and what doesnt before you can start doing set plays and think ahead of pace (pro-active gameplay instead of reactive) and VERY many of those games are gonna look like shit and play like shit but they will be useful going forward which is what you want to be focusing on to improve
     
    i tend to spam games for 2-4 weeks before going on hiatus again for 2 months as that’s what my uni schedule lets me do (no time to game pmuch) and that is how i have played for the past 2 years (or just not play at all) and it’s the same for me every time:
    im rusty and need to work on my mechanics first> then i need to get my meta read up to speed and until i have like 200+ games under my belt since coming back i am actually a pretty mediocre superuni and my stats arent great until i get back to speed but i have done this process so many times now that i can be aware of this and get some monster games on experience alone to help my averages in the mean time but i am still in a learning mindset before tryharding (helps A LOT with staying sane too)
    this is the same for trying new tanks for me, my first 10 games are always great but set 20-50 really suck because i’m still limit testing and die a lot in stupid places because i am not able to estimate capabilities yet and stopped the ”new tank tryhard caution” thing (idk if this is a thing for other players but it definitely is for me lol) 

    my gameplay starts to shine when i have put enough time into the game AND tank im playing which means i two major objectives to achieve before really being able to tryhard and stop the learning process and focus on damage gameplay at all times to stop the stupid dying and keep consistency up
    some players like Barry seem to be the other way around, plug n play and super fast at getting meta-reads even after long breaks but for me there is a substantial flat quantity of games i need to play before i can perform well enough to my own standards but every single one of those games have some purpose behind them so you can speed this process up to ~200 (for me, likely less for others) games rather than the 10k+ games it took to become a super-uni in the first place right 
    obviously i don’t show my learning periods of gameplay as they’re not great which is also how i avoid getting revealed in Hall of Fame when boosting as I happen to downpad my stats a lot before the tryhard kicks in and 6k combined average sessions start to stack up  
    the point being is that getting back up to speed takes proper testing of what works and what doesn’t before you can start playing the game for real and until you get comfortable you’re always going to play worse than normal so focus on that first, then start pushing your luck in game as often as you can (without being retarded - this is a finer line to walk than what it looks like) to get as much value out of every game as possible until you feel you have enough information available to play a map/tank combination out with a solid gameplan and able to problemsolve them when they don’t work. When you reach that point is when you start feeling real differences in gameplay, when I stagnate I just repeat this again until I hit my standards. It’s a tedious process but when performance is a requirement for fun it’s important not to cheat and rely on old experiences when you need to play catch up
     
  4. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Snoregasm2 in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    first game was winnable for sure, with 0 mechanical misplay you would have evened out the score at the end and have the HP to kill the Skorp off, considering the 140 was AFK all you needed to win that game at the end was 6-800HP to use after killing the 1-4 to have a real shot at carrying it.. the other games you were not as able to really influence the outcome in a CAX, Karelia especially I had a hard time figuring out how to get even an acceptable game out of it at all. No proactive play anywhere seemed good and Karelia is a shitty ass map to play passively on with 3 arties.. you could have done more but that game was tricky, besides some clever trading on the IS-7 (imo u could have farmed from full to 0 with max one shot taken) and then pushing the TD behind there just wasn’t any situation on the map with any substantial damage to farm
    serene showcases your mechanical issues very well, i would have dumped every single shell you fired that game into their tracks to keep them in place and farmable to win out on trades - CAX turret is only strong when you poke on them, not when they poke on you. After they blow repkit you have a 90 second window to figure out how to kill them as cleanly as possible and with gun dep as a CAX you will always be able to shoot their tracks there, pull back on rld, retrack and mitigate the damage taken and win the C1 engage before the enemy team pushes you through middle into it, prolonging the game (not super carryable and hard to see how to get out of it alive but 3k+ dmg extra easy was there to farm for free)
  5. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Snoregasm2 in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
  6. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from sohojacques in Post-1.9 Balance Changes   
    lol at dirizon downvoting "the news"
  7. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from arceusdrago in Post-1.9 Balance Changes   
    lol at dirizon downvoting "the news"
  8. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from ZXrage in Post-1.9 Balance Changes   
    lol at dirizon downvoting "the news"
  9. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from RC_Tank in Post-1.9 Balance Changes   
    lol at dirizon downvoting "the news"
  10. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Private_Miros in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    Depends on what you want to learn, sounds like a douchy answer but it's kind of important as you pick up different things from different vehicles. Your experiences and subjective playstyle also mean you pick up different things than other people will from the same situations. Start off with if you want to get better at a gameplay element or just a specific tank. The first is much more useful as you can apply those to many more tanks but they don't come with experience as you often have to actively play towards your goal to learn from it rather than focusing on playing as well as possible which is something that very many have trouble letting go of (myself included). 
    Autoloaders for example gives you a lot of practice playing as the center of attention, as you deal burst damage people focus you and that focus is exactly what you can take with you and apply to other tanks as well, having 1k autoloader games banked will end up mattering when you're playing as a top tier single shooter in a 357, again as the center of attention, especially with multiple arties. This should help connect the dots that you can learn something elsewhere than where you want to apply it. 357MM as top tier is much more rare and doesn't let you practice controlling the game very often, but you can spam autoloaders days on end and practice this specific thing for as long as you want, and then apply it to the tank you feel just gets too much focus for you to play well. OP tanks tend to get more focus, so this is what I did to bypass that problem and get better. You'll also pick up other things meanwhile practicing specifics, and don't pidgeon hole yourself into only that specific thing but remaining aware of the other positives you experienced during the practice of what you want to improve to speed up these processes. 
    This is not the only things autoloaders are good for when it comes to practice, but it's one that is hard to practice anywhere else. As I previously mentioned you want a comfortable practice environment that generally means going down tiers to simplify gameplay to get good practice. Good practice doesn't mean easy games though, you don't learn from easy games. You want to be challenged but still be in control. That's a thin line to walk but where you're going to learn the most. You want as many of your games as possible to be fruitful for the future, which is different from playing for performance. Performance means no risk-taking, but learning generally means the opposite as you want to expand your options and as a result will end up being having to try new things and see what works. This is a lot of stupid dying and derpy games, but that is fine as long as you take something from them. Just remember to toggle this off once you feel comfortable with the topic you decided to practice though and go back to risk-averse gameplay with your newly refined skillset. The thing is you want to get a feel of what is actually a risk and what is not and you don't really get to that point without testing your limits.
    Risk-averse mean something entirely different for a 50% player and me. Playing passive in my eyes would still be considered aggressive to most players because they don't know that the decisions I'm making have sound reasoning behind them and thus less risky to make than meets the eye, they are totally safe because I ran the numbers before making it. So risk is  percieved as subjective, and you want to make it as objective as possible meaning you want information and really nurture your ability to interpret the information. There are many "close calls" that were nothing of the kind, and there were also situations where I really fucked up but no one was aware enough to catch my mistake. When that happens I try my best to recognise them as mistakes still, it's hard but mistakes usually don't go unpunished in tier 10 so remembering it for next time has generally been a net positive over letting them go for the sake of my ego. 
    Start off with figuring out one of your bigger issues in gameplay for a certain tank. Try to figure out a setting that makes you practice this, whether it's something simple to work on like dying less or more nuanced like getting better at reading enemy intentions etc is totally up to you. The important thing is to determine a gameplay aspect that could use improvement and simply doing something towards that goal as you play. 
    If DPG or stats is of any concern then you want to limit test in a different tank than the one you want to improve, I couldn't care less about my service record so I generally just spam the tank I want to get better at directly. I rarely practice specifics like above anymore as I tend to focus on the specific tank for a pretty substantial period of time if my performance isn't what I want it to be yet instead. (M60 would be a good example, I was nowhere close to 3marking it at the start but after 500 games or so I had the highest average on the server by like 900 for the last 50 of them because I just stuck to it and really got the playstyle locked down on every single map, starting at sub 4k DPG for first 50 and 5,8k for the 50 at the end which is a HUGE difference considering it actually had very little to do with good/bad sessions).
    This is probably because I tend to pick these things up by sheer game quantity over quality practice. I don't really practice in that way anymore because when I do end up playing again I tend to have a specific goal in mind and only playing towards that. (Generally a T10 reward tank 3MoE or DPG challenge). I tend to stick to one tank until I am satisfied and that's what works for me right now with how often I play the game these days. Doesn't really matter what tank in the end, go through your replays if you're struggling to find what you're doing wrong and inspect them until you find a lapse in judgement, be more precise and nitpicky as you get further into this and you'll eventually find yourself becoming a better player.
  11. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Ham_ in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
  12. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from SlyMeerkat in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    Depends on what you want to learn, sounds like a douchy answer but it's kind of important as you pick up different things from different vehicles. Your experiences and subjective playstyle also mean you pick up different things than other people will from the same situations. Start off with if you want to get better at a gameplay element or just a specific tank. The first is much more useful as you can apply those to many more tanks but they don't come with experience as you often have to actively play towards your goal to learn from it rather than focusing on playing as well as possible which is something that very many have trouble letting go of (myself included). 
    Autoloaders for example gives you a lot of practice playing as the center of attention, as you deal burst damage people focus you and that focus is exactly what you can take with you and apply to other tanks as well, having 1k autoloader games banked will end up mattering when you're playing as a top tier single shooter in a 357, again as the center of attention, especially with multiple arties. This should help connect the dots that you can learn something elsewhere than where you want to apply it. 357MM as top tier is much more rare and doesn't let you practice controlling the game very often, but you can spam autoloaders days on end and practice this specific thing for as long as you want, and then apply it to the tank you feel just gets too much focus for you to play well. OP tanks tend to get more focus, so this is what I did to bypass that problem and get better. You'll also pick up other things meanwhile practicing specifics, and don't pidgeon hole yourself into only that specific thing but remaining aware of the other positives you experienced during the practice of what you want to improve to speed up these processes. 
    This is not the only things autoloaders are good for when it comes to practice, but it's one that is hard to practice anywhere else. As I previously mentioned you want a comfortable practice environment that generally means going down tiers to simplify gameplay to get good practice. Good practice doesn't mean easy games though, you don't learn from easy games. You want to be challenged but still be in control. That's a thin line to walk but where you're going to learn the most. You want as many of your games as possible to be fruitful for the future, which is different from playing for performance. Performance means no risk-taking, but learning generally means the opposite as you want to expand your options and as a result will end up being having to try new things and see what works. This is a lot of stupid dying and derpy games, but that is fine as long as you take something from them. Just remember to toggle this off once you feel comfortable with the topic you decided to practice though and go back to risk-averse gameplay with your newly refined skillset. The thing is you want to get a feel of what is actually a risk and what is not and you don't really get to that point without testing your limits.
    Risk-averse mean something entirely different for a 50% player and me. Playing passive in my eyes would still be considered aggressive to most players because they don't know that the decisions I'm making have sound reasoning behind them and thus less risky to make than meets the eye, they are totally safe because I ran the numbers before making it. So risk is  percieved as subjective, and you want to make it as objective as possible meaning you want information and really nurture your ability to interpret the information. There are many "close calls" that were nothing of the kind, and there were also situations where I really fucked up but no one was aware enough to catch my mistake. When that happens I try my best to recognise them as mistakes still, it's hard but mistakes usually don't go unpunished in tier 10 so remembering it for next time has generally been a net positive over letting them go for the sake of my ego. 
    Start off with figuring out one of your bigger issues in gameplay for a certain tank. Try to figure out a setting that makes you practice this, whether it's something simple to work on like dying less or more nuanced like getting better at reading enemy intentions etc is totally up to you. The important thing is to determine a gameplay aspect that could use improvement and simply doing something towards that goal as you play. 
    If DPG or stats is of any concern then you want to limit test in a different tank than the one you want to improve, I couldn't care less about my service record so I generally just spam the tank I want to get better at directly. I rarely practice specifics like above anymore as I tend to focus on the specific tank for a pretty substantial period of time if my performance isn't what I want it to be yet instead. (M60 would be a good example, I was nowhere close to 3marking it at the start but after 500 games or so I had the highest average on the server by like 900 for the last 50 of them because I just stuck to it and really got the playstyle locked down on every single map, starting at sub 4k DPG for first 50 and 5,8k for the 50 at the end which is a HUGE difference considering it actually had very little to do with good/bad sessions).
    This is probably because I tend to pick these things up by sheer game quantity over quality practice. I don't really practice in that way anymore because when I do end up playing again I tend to have a specific goal in mind and only playing towards that. (Generally a T10 reward tank 3MoE or DPG challenge). I tend to stick to one tank until I am satisfied and that's what works for me right now with how often I play the game these days. Doesn't really matter what tank in the end, go through your replays if you're struggling to find what you're doing wrong and inspect them until you find a lapse in judgement, be more precise and nitpicky as you get further into this and you'll eventually find yourself becoming a better player.
  13. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Wanderjar in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    i really can’t stress enough how valuable track shots are for farming, not just for you but your teammates as well - if the enemy can’t move they can’t get safe and cannot fight on their terms which is always what you want to be doing, even in autoloaders i spam trackshots despite risking not damaging a shot for either burning their repkit or keeping them in place in a position where they are farmable. that’s where you want to keep your enemies ideally, keep them in the sweet spot where you can fight them but they can’t push you
    you also seem to value staying alive over impacting the game a tad too much, this is not a habit i would remove though, all it needs is a slight adjustment (staying alive is still a super important aspect and should be valued very highly) so i would advise you to try more things out - as you’re returning from a long break the mechanics come back eventually but you want to get as deep into the meta-read ASAP meaning you’re going to have to try stuff and test limits on what works and what doesnt before you can start doing set plays and think ahead of pace (pro-active gameplay instead of reactive) and VERY many of those games are gonna look like shit and play like shit but they will be useful going forward which is what you want to be focusing on to improve
     
    i tend to spam games for 2-4 weeks before going on hiatus again for 2 months as that’s what my uni schedule lets me do (no time to game pmuch) and that is how i have played for the past 2 years (or just not play at all) and it’s the same for me every time:
    im rusty and need to work on my mechanics first> then i need to get my meta read up to speed and until i have like 200+ games under my belt since coming back i am actually a pretty mediocre superuni and my stats arent great until i get back to speed but i have done this process so many times now that i can be aware of this and get some monster games on experience alone to help my averages in the mean time but i am still in a learning mindset before tryharding (helps A LOT with staying sane too)
    this is the same for trying new tanks for me, my first 10 games are always great but set 20-50 really suck because i’m still limit testing and die a lot in stupid places because i am not able to estimate capabilities yet and stopped the ”new tank tryhard caution” thing (idk if this is a thing for other players but it definitely is for me lol) 

    my gameplay starts to shine when i have put enough time into the game AND tank im playing which means i two major objectives to achieve before really being able to tryhard and stop the learning process and focus on damage gameplay at all times to stop the stupid dying and keep consistency up
    some players like Barry seem to be the other way around, plug n play and super fast at getting meta-reads even after long breaks but for me there is a substantial flat quantity of games i need to play before i can perform well enough to my own standards but every single one of those games have some purpose behind them so you can speed this process up to ~200 (for me, likely less for others) games rather than the 10k+ games it took to become a super-uni in the first place right 
    obviously i don’t show my learning periods of gameplay as they’re not great which is also how i avoid getting revealed in Hall of Fame when boosting as I happen to downpad my stats a lot before the tryhard kicks in and 6k combined average sessions start to stack up  
    the point being is that getting back up to speed takes proper testing of what works and what doesn’t before you can start playing the game for real and until you get comfortable you’re always going to play worse than normal so focus on that first, then start pushing your luck in game as often as you can (without being retarded - this is a finer line to walk than what it looks like) to get as much value out of every game as possible until you feel you have enough information available to play a map/tank combination out with a solid gameplan and able to problemsolve them when they don’t work. When you reach that point is when you start feeling real differences in gameplay, when I stagnate I just repeat this again until I hit my standards. It’s a tedious process but when performance is a requirement for fun it’s important not to cheat and rely on old experiences when you need to play catch up
     
  14. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Wanderjar in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    Depends on what you want to learn, sounds like a douchy answer but it's kind of important as you pick up different things from different vehicles. Your experiences and subjective playstyle also mean you pick up different things than other people will from the same situations. Start off with if you want to get better at a gameplay element or just a specific tank. The first is much more useful as you can apply those to many more tanks but they don't come with experience as you often have to actively play towards your goal to learn from it rather than focusing on playing as well as possible which is something that very many have trouble letting go of (myself included). 
    Autoloaders for example gives you a lot of practice playing as the center of attention, as you deal burst damage people focus you and that focus is exactly what you can take with you and apply to other tanks as well, having 1k autoloader games banked will end up mattering when you're playing as a top tier single shooter in a 357, again as the center of attention, especially with multiple arties. This should help connect the dots that you can learn something elsewhere than where you want to apply it. 357MM as top tier is much more rare and doesn't let you practice controlling the game very often, but you can spam autoloaders days on end and practice this specific thing for as long as you want, and then apply it to the tank you feel just gets too much focus for you to play well. OP tanks tend to get more focus, so this is what I did to bypass that problem and get better. You'll also pick up other things meanwhile practicing specifics, and don't pidgeon hole yourself into only that specific thing but remaining aware of the other positives you experienced during the practice of what you want to improve to speed up these processes. 
    This is not the only things autoloaders are good for when it comes to practice, but it's one that is hard to practice anywhere else. As I previously mentioned you want a comfortable practice environment that generally means going down tiers to simplify gameplay to get good practice. Good practice doesn't mean easy games though, you don't learn from easy games. You want to be challenged but still be in control. That's a thin line to walk but where you're going to learn the most. You want as many of your games as possible to be fruitful for the future, which is different from playing for performance. Performance means no risk-taking, but learning generally means the opposite as you want to expand your options and as a result will end up being having to try new things and see what works. This is a lot of stupid dying and derpy games, but that is fine as long as you take something from them. Just remember to toggle this off once you feel comfortable with the topic you decided to practice though and go back to risk-averse gameplay with your newly refined skillset. The thing is you want to get a feel of what is actually a risk and what is not and you don't really get to that point without testing your limits.
    Risk-averse mean something entirely different for a 50% player and me. Playing passive in my eyes would still be considered aggressive to most players because they don't know that the decisions I'm making have sound reasoning behind them and thus less risky to make than meets the eye, they are totally safe because I ran the numbers before making it. So risk is  percieved as subjective, and you want to make it as objective as possible meaning you want information and really nurture your ability to interpret the information. There are many "close calls" that were nothing of the kind, and there were also situations where I really fucked up but no one was aware enough to catch my mistake. When that happens I try my best to recognise them as mistakes still, it's hard but mistakes usually don't go unpunished in tier 10 so remembering it for next time has generally been a net positive over letting them go for the sake of my ego. 
    Start off with figuring out one of your bigger issues in gameplay for a certain tank. Try to figure out a setting that makes you practice this, whether it's something simple to work on like dying less or more nuanced like getting better at reading enemy intentions etc is totally up to you. The important thing is to determine a gameplay aspect that could use improvement and simply doing something towards that goal as you play. 
    If DPG or stats is of any concern then you want to limit test in a different tank than the one you want to improve, I couldn't care less about my service record so I generally just spam the tank I want to get better at directly. I rarely practice specifics like above anymore as I tend to focus on the specific tank for a pretty substantial period of time if my performance isn't what I want it to be yet instead. (M60 would be a good example, I was nowhere close to 3marking it at the start but after 500 games or so I had the highest average on the server by like 900 for the last 50 of them because I just stuck to it and really got the playstyle locked down on every single map, starting at sub 4k DPG for first 50 and 5,8k for the 50 at the end which is a HUGE difference considering it actually had very little to do with good/bad sessions).
    This is probably because I tend to pick these things up by sheer game quantity over quality practice. I don't really practice in that way anymore because when I do end up playing again I tend to have a specific goal in mind and only playing towards that. (Generally a T10 reward tank 3MoE or DPG challenge). I tend to stick to one tank until I am satisfied and that's what works for me right now with how often I play the game these days. Doesn't really matter what tank in the end, go through your replays if you're struggling to find what you're doing wrong and inspect them until you find a lapse in judgement, be more precise and nitpicky as you get further into this and you'll eventually find yourself becoming a better player.
  15. Like
    kolni got a reaction from Wanderjar in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
  16. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from sohojacques in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    first game was winnable for sure, with 0 mechanical misplay you would have evened out the score at the end and have the HP to kill the Skorp off, considering the 140 was AFK all you needed to win that game at the end was 6-800HP to use after killing the 1-4 to have a real shot at carrying it.. the other games you were not as able to really influence the outcome in a CAX, Karelia especially I had a hard time figuring out how to get even an acceptable game out of it at all. No proactive play anywhere seemed good and Karelia is a shitty ass map to play passively on with 3 arties.. you could have done more but that game was tricky, besides some clever trading on the IS-7 (imo u could have farmed from full to 0 with max one shot taken) and then pushing the TD behind there just wasn’t any situation on the map with any substantial damage to farm
    serene showcases your mechanical issues very well, i would have dumped every single shell you fired that game into their tracks to keep them in place and farmable to win out on trades - CAX turret is only strong when you poke on them, not when they poke on you. After they blow repkit you have a 90 second window to figure out how to kill them as cleanly as possible and with gun dep as a CAX you will always be able to shoot their tracks there, pull back on rld, retrack and mitigate the damage taken and win the C1 engage before the enemy team pushes you through middle into it, prolonging the game (not super carryable and hard to see how to get out of it alive but 3k+ dmg extra easy was there to farm for free)
  17. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from Private_Miros in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    first game was winnable for sure, with 0 mechanical misplay you would have evened out the score at the end and have the HP to kill the Skorp off, considering the 140 was AFK all you needed to win that game at the end was 6-800HP to use after killing the 1-4 to have a real shot at carrying it.. the other games you were not as able to really influence the outcome in a CAX, Karelia especially I had a hard time figuring out how to get even an acceptable game out of it at all. No proactive play anywhere seemed good and Karelia is a shitty ass map to play passively on with 3 arties.. you could have done more but that game was tricky, besides some clever trading on the IS-7 (imo u could have farmed from full to 0 with max one shot taken) and then pushing the TD behind there just wasn’t any situation on the map with any substantial damage to farm
    serene showcases your mechanical issues very well, i would have dumped every single shell you fired that game into their tracks to keep them in place and farmable to win out on trades - CAX turret is only strong when you poke on them, not when they poke on you. After they blow repkit you have a 90 second window to figure out how to kill them as cleanly as possible and with gun dep as a CAX you will always be able to shoot their tracks there, pull back on rld, retrack and mitigate the damage taken and win the C1 engage before the enemy team pushes you through middle into it, prolonging the game (not super carryable and hard to see how to get out of it alive but 3k+ dmg extra easy was there to farm for free)
  18. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from GTD in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    As of now, every viable tier 10 tank either has some sort of gimmick to leverage or just an overtuned kit in general. The gimmicky ones usually have flaws to play around when facing them, but the ones with overtuned kits tend to simply roll you over as a lower tier, and you rarely get to pressure an advantage in full tier 10 games as the terms seems are generally unbalanced and hard to estimate. Hull down snipefights is one of the most common aspects of the game and it is absolutely terrible gameplay, just an example but you get the point.
     
    Some examples of the first would be:
    Autoloaders High alpha guns Super high mobility vehicles These are fairly simple to play around because you know what they are going to do every game. Niche vehicles tend to go into set plays per map much more often than not and as such they get much easier to predict and counter. EBR’s really suck but I’m simply going to flat out tell you that if you can’t hit them reliably, your aim is bad. Their wheels are complete BS game balance wise but at this point you should be able to adjust to it. It’s part of the game now so the thing you can do instead of whining (it is valitaded, I know) you should be focusing on what you can improve, in the EBR case that would simply be aiming. It’s a terrible introduction to the game but don’t let that stagnate your progress. 
     
    On the other hand we have tanks like Chieftain, 907, 430U and such that are just statistically overpowered vehicles in most metrics. They are never easy to fight and you’re going to have to learn that the hard way. Even the dumbest monkey in a Chieftain has a real chance to win duels against considerably better players because of his tank selection. Which leads me to the topic at hand: Tank selection is everything in tier 10. Playing off-meta means you directly disadvantage yourself against everyone playing meta before you even click battle. If you want to learn how tier 10 works in its current state you need to spend time with it, and you generally want to be in control and figure out what works and what doesn’t. How do you do that? Pick strong vehicles. You want to develop that decision making ability but you won’t get to make many decisions when you constantly have to let the enemy make its move because you have a worse tank. 

    Since the full tier 10 MM is by far the most common, this gets more important. You don’t have anything to free farm to inflate your DPG, you have to work for it. This means no auto-piloting whatsoever because there are too many guns that have big enough impact to ruin your game entirely of one mistake. Aim for non-losing gameplay rather than winning. I don’t find the meta particularly different, just the tank balance being off. I generally try to avoid the stuff I don’t want to fight until I have to, even if that means giving up where I initially wanted to go during the countdown. If you care about performance in games then tank selection is going to have to be a part of it. 
    I find the meta to be increasingly faster and faster, compared to 4-5 years ago where playing full games at 500 meters was a legitimate viable strategy for most mediums. In that sense, yes, there’s more aggression today than before because people are fighting not only against their enemies but teammates for performance. This means people are going to cut corners and find ways to do this more efficiently, which leads to higher tempo gameplay. 
    When do you play aggressively? When you have all the information needed to make that play. How likely is it that this play is going to work? Estimate it, try it, re-estimate the value of the play in said situation. 
    I am mostly a passive player, so my play is almost exclusively reactive. I deploy to positions I know well, damage to farm and most importantly have a fall back option. If I’m wrong I don’t want my game to end so I never purposefully do plays that are questionable but “would be good if they paid off”. That type of “what if” thinking needs to work the other way too. What if this goes wrong? What should I do? Have an exit strategy ready so your game doesn’t end because of a misread earlier on. 
    I’d say the meta is fairly different too, arty being the main difference as there’s basically always 3 of them. Not much you can do about that sadly, once an arty has decided that he’s going to kill you there’s basically nothing you can do to prevent him from singling you out. The advice I have there is to go dark just before arty reloads so that he just might switch to another target. 
    It’s a harder game than any other tiers for sure, but you also learn the most from it. If I go back to tier 9 again I’m fairly sure I’d just roll over everybody because I’m almost able to do that in tier 10 too. Tier 9 doesn’t have so many gimmick tanks to be constantly be aware of, and has less variables which makes it an easier tier to play. This is the place you want to be at, comfort means a lot and you should be playing where you are performing the best, perfecting your gameplay in a more comfortable setting makes it easier to take those with you and apply them to more nuanced concepts and situations. Keep doing what works, try and up the difficulty every now and then and see if your skill set holds up. If it does, great; if not then you can just go back and practice more. 
    The meta itself of tier 10 isn’t very different, people still play the same positions and the game flow works the same, just at higher stakes. If it gets too complicated you simply have to accept that you’re not quite there yet. Self-criticism is the biggest part of improvement and the more you do it the higher chances are you’ll end up a better player afterwards. Blaming external factors doesn’t help you. Arty sucks, EBRs suck, unbalanced maps etc etc. You can’t do anything to change those, so focus on playing around them. What can I do to simplify these problems for myself? 
    For pure aggressive play I’d recommend starting out small. High probability actions that still are dictating actions. Try to control the engagements, think out ways to achieve whatever it is you actually want to do, before you do them. An enemy tank needs to die that’s hard to kill? Find out ways to do it safely, and if you can’t figure one out then you have the options of gambling or thinking of something else. Take the latter option. You can still control areas without putting stakes into it. Don’t know how? Try something. I will always recommend safer play when stakes are high, but when you really are at a loss it’s not like you’re going to end up with a great idea anyway, so try any idea. Sometimes they work out, great. You didn’t learn shit but at least you saved a game that should have been bad. 
     
    I also recommend studying the minimap a lot, especially at decisive points of action. See a push happening? Then you want to know how it develops from there, is it common? Can you use this experience for something useful, like assuming it normally happens (after it has happened enough times). This lets you skip steps both in decision making and focus, letting you be more concerned with what’s happening on your screen rather than the map once you understand it. You need to understand the map before you can start making aggressive plays reliably, because most players react the same way to the same things. Knowing that, you know what said aggressively play will result in, how the enemy will react and now you can build upon that knowledge to think even further ahead of that aggressive play. More foresight leads to much more stable gameplay, so the biggest piece of advice to your questions (even though I didn’t really answer any of them in concrete terms) is that you should understand other players better. All the 48-52% players are bunched together anyway, they don’t try to get into other players’ heads at all and react exclusively to what they see happening on their screen and not the minimap. No foresight whatsoever, meaning you can abuse the living shit out of it and simply win over them by playing big picture. Similar to GMs beating mathematically perfect playing computers in chess. Or the macro concept in DoTA/League. It’s a super advanced concept that doesn’t really apply until you are comfortable enough mechanically to beat anyone you come across. You want to be at that point mechanically, because mechanics don’t require thinking once you are comfortable enough with your game knowledge to keep your head in big picture, all the time. You shouldn’t be considering things like “Where should I aim to pen this tank?” or “How much do I need to lead my shell?”; those things should be etched in your skin and happen automatically, because then you can start playing the map which is what tier 10 is all about. You don’t have any substantial  mechanical advantages in tier 10, so your theoretical advantages are what you’re going to want to leverage. A good place to start would be staying at least 1 step ahead of what you’re currently doing, while simultaneously having a fallback if it didn’t work out. Try sticking to that rule at every point of the game, and if you find yourself drifting away from it, you failed. Try again. Once that becomes routine you can add more variables into the mix, like managing HP in ways to prevent pub monkeys yoloing you from actually succeeding, and the more questionable parts of what in reality should be possible know and not. The point is that if you are unaware of something you can’t prepare against it, meaning you have stopped being in control of your gameplay. Try and stop letting that happen and you will find yourself having much more stable games. 
     
    This is all in very broad terms, but concepts like this are hard to verbalize unless you make them super specific which usually only applies to the specific situations and little to actually draw from.
     
    I don’t really feel that I properly answered your questions, more guiding you in the right direction of becoming comfortable with how tier 10 works. The hard truth is that there’s no easy fix to somehow getting better, it’s a grind that takes time and constantly humbling yourself enough to accept that even if the result of something going bad wasn’t directly your fault, you can’t dwell on that since it doesn’t improve you as a player. It happened, so it was a bad decision. Could you have known that? Try and figure those things out and start playing the game ahead of time. A good rule of thumb that has been working for me is always staying 30 seconds ahead of the map and checking if my assumptions are right, and why they were/weren’t. You need to get into the heads of other players and pull mind-gamey shit to be the protagonist player of every game, which is what everyone wants. When you are in control you can do whatever you want, but at a loss of what to do, take the backseat and let the game develop more until you start to understand what’s happening. This doesn’t mean doing nothing, just simpler gameplay where you have teammates to play around and good amounts of information to make the easier assumptions. 
     
    TL;DR - Take the blame for mistakes, even if you feel they weren’t yours. What could you have done to improve the situation, regardless of what actually happened? Do this every game and you’ll be improving. Tier 10 is all about eliminating mistakes rather than improving positives.
     
  19. Like
    kolni got a reaction from GTD in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
  20. Like
    kolni got a reaction from Private_Miros in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
  21. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from SlyMeerkat in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    As of now, every viable tier 10 tank either has some sort of gimmick to leverage or just an overtuned kit in general. The gimmicky ones usually have flaws to play around when facing them, but the ones with overtuned kits tend to simply roll you over as a lower tier, and you rarely get to pressure an advantage in full tier 10 games as the terms seems are generally unbalanced and hard to estimate. Hull down snipefights is one of the most common aspects of the game and it is absolutely terrible gameplay, just an example but you get the point.
     
    Some examples of the first would be:
    Autoloaders High alpha guns Super high mobility vehicles These are fairly simple to play around because you know what they are going to do every game. Niche vehicles tend to go into set plays per map much more often than not and as such they get much easier to predict and counter. EBR’s really suck but I’m simply going to flat out tell you that if you can’t hit them reliably, your aim is bad. Their wheels are complete BS game balance wise but at this point you should be able to adjust to it. It’s part of the game now so the thing you can do instead of whining (it is valitaded, I know) you should be focusing on what you can improve, in the EBR case that would simply be aiming. It’s a terrible introduction to the game but don’t let that stagnate your progress. 
     
    On the other hand we have tanks like Chieftain, 907, 430U and such that are just statistically overpowered vehicles in most metrics. They are never easy to fight and you’re going to have to learn that the hard way. Even the dumbest monkey in a Chieftain has a real chance to win duels against considerably better players because of his tank selection. Which leads me to the topic at hand: Tank selection is everything in tier 10. Playing off-meta means you directly disadvantage yourself against everyone playing meta before you even click battle. If you want to learn how tier 10 works in its current state you need to spend time with it, and you generally want to be in control and figure out what works and what doesn’t. How do you do that? Pick strong vehicles. You want to develop that decision making ability but you won’t get to make many decisions when you constantly have to let the enemy make its move because you have a worse tank. 

    Since the full tier 10 MM is by far the most common, this gets more important. You don’t have anything to free farm to inflate your DPG, you have to work for it. This means no auto-piloting whatsoever because there are too many guns that have big enough impact to ruin your game entirely of one mistake. Aim for non-losing gameplay rather than winning. I don’t find the meta particularly different, just the tank balance being off. I generally try to avoid the stuff I don’t want to fight until I have to, even if that means giving up where I initially wanted to go during the countdown. If you care about performance in games then tank selection is going to have to be a part of it. 
    I find the meta to be increasingly faster and faster, compared to 4-5 years ago where playing full games at 500 meters was a legitimate viable strategy for most mediums. In that sense, yes, there’s more aggression today than before because people are fighting not only against their enemies but teammates for performance. This means people are going to cut corners and find ways to do this more efficiently, which leads to higher tempo gameplay. 
    When do you play aggressively? When you have all the information needed to make that play. How likely is it that this play is going to work? Estimate it, try it, re-estimate the value of the play in said situation. 
    I am mostly a passive player, so my play is almost exclusively reactive. I deploy to positions I know well, damage to farm and most importantly have a fall back option. If I’m wrong I don’t want my game to end so I never purposefully do plays that are questionable but “would be good if they paid off”. That type of “what if” thinking needs to work the other way too. What if this goes wrong? What should I do? Have an exit strategy ready so your game doesn’t end because of a misread earlier on. 
    I’d say the meta is fairly different too, arty being the main difference as there’s basically always 3 of them. Not much you can do about that sadly, once an arty has decided that he’s going to kill you there’s basically nothing you can do to prevent him from singling you out. The advice I have there is to go dark just before arty reloads so that he just might switch to another target. 
    It’s a harder game than any other tiers for sure, but you also learn the most from it. If I go back to tier 9 again I’m fairly sure I’d just roll over everybody because I’m almost able to do that in tier 10 too. Tier 9 doesn’t have so many gimmick tanks to be constantly be aware of, and has less variables which makes it an easier tier to play. This is the place you want to be at, comfort means a lot and you should be playing where you are performing the best, perfecting your gameplay in a more comfortable setting makes it easier to take those with you and apply them to more nuanced concepts and situations. Keep doing what works, try and up the difficulty every now and then and see if your skill set holds up. If it does, great; if not then you can just go back and practice more. 
    The meta itself of tier 10 isn’t very different, people still play the same positions and the game flow works the same, just at higher stakes. If it gets too complicated you simply have to accept that you’re not quite there yet. Self-criticism is the biggest part of improvement and the more you do it the higher chances are you’ll end up a better player afterwards. Blaming external factors doesn’t help you. Arty sucks, EBRs suck, unbalanced maps etc etc. You can’t do anything to change those, so focus on playing around them. What can I do to simplify these problems for myself? 
    For pure aggressive play I’d recommend starting out small. High probability actions that still are dictating actions. Try to control the engagements, think out ways to achieve whatever it is you actually want to do, before you do them. An enemy tank needs to die that’s hard to kill? Find out ways to do it safely, and if you can’t figure one out then you have the options of gambling or thinking of something else. Take the latter option. You can still control areas without putting stakes into it. Don’t know how? Try something. I will always recommend safer play when stakes are high, but when you really are at a loss it’s not like you’re going to end up with a great idea anyway, so try any idea. Sometimes they work out, great. You didn’t learn shit but at least you saved a game that should have been bad. 
     
    I also recommend studying the minimap a lot, especially at decisive points of action. See a push happening? Then you want to know how it develops from there, is it common? Can you use this experience for something useful, like assuming it normally happens (after it has happened enough times). This lets you skip steps both in decision making and focus, letting you be more concerned with what’s happening on your screen rather than the map once you understand it. You need to understand the map before you can start making aggressive plays reliably, because most players react the same way to the same things. Knowing that, you know what said aggressively play will result in, how the enemy will react and now you can build upon that knowledge to think even further ahead of that aggressive play. More foresight leads to much more stable gameplay, so the biggest piece of advice to your questions (even though I didn’t really answer any of them in concrete terms) is that you should understand other players better. All the 48-52% players are bunched together anyway, they don’t try to get into other players’ heads at all and react exclusively to what they see happening on their screen and not the minimap. No foresight whatsoever, meaning you can abuse the living shit out of it and simply win over them by playing big picture. Similar to GMs beating mathematically perfect playing computers in chess. Or the macro concept in DoTA/League. It’s a super advanced concept that doesn’t really apply until you are comfortable enough mechanically to beat anyone you come across. You want to be at that point mechanically, because mechanics don’t require thinking once you are comfortable enough with your game knowledge to keep your head in big picture, all the time. You shouldn’t be considering things like “Where should I aim to pen this tank?” or “How much do I need to lead my shell?”; those things should be etched in your skin and happen automatically, because then you can start playing the map which is what tier 10 is all about. You don’t have any substantial  mechanical advantages in tier 10, so your theoretical advantages are what you’re going to want to leverage. A good place to start would be staying at least 1 step ahead of what you’re currently doing, while simultaneously having a fallback if it didn’t work out. Try sticking to that rule at every point of the game, and if you find yourself drifting away from it, you failed. Try again. Once that becomes routine you can add more variables into the mix, like managing HP in ways to prevent pub monkeys yoloing you from actually succeeding, and the more questionable parts of what in reality should be possible know and not. The point is that if you are unaware of something you can’t prepare against it, meaning you have stopped being in control of your gameplay. Try and stop letting that happen and you will find yourself having much more stable games. 
     
    This is all in very broad terms, but concepts like this are hard to verbalize unless you make them super specific which usually only applies to the specific situations and little to actually draw from.
     
    I don’t really feel that I properly answered your questions, more guiding you in the right direction of becoming comfortable with how tier 10 works. The hard truth is that there’s no easy fix to somehow getting better, it’s a grind that takes time and constantly humbling yourself enough to accept that even if the result of something going bad wasn’t directly your fault, you can’t dwell on that since it doesn’t improve you as a player. It happened, so it was a bad decision. Could you have known that? Try and figure those things out and start playing the game ahead of time. A good rule of thumb that has been working for me is always staying 30 seconds ahead of the map and checking if my assumptions are right, and why they were/weren’t. You need to get into the heads of other players and pull mind-gamey shit to be the protagonist player of every game, which is what everyone wants. When you are in control you can do whatever you want, but at a loss of what to do, take the backseat and let the game develop more until you start to understand what’s happening. This doesn’t mean doing nothing, just simpler gameplay where you have teammates to play around and good amounts of information to make the easier assumptions. 
     
    TL;DR - Take the blame for mistakes, even if you feel they weren’t yours. What could you have done to improve the situation, regardless of what actually happened? Do this every game and you’ll be improving. Tier 10 is all about eliminating mistakes rather than improving positives.
     
  22. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from arceusdrago in Pick a (WoT) Topic for Kolni to write about   
    ima be honest, this is one heckin tricky thing to explain, spent maybe 3 hours trying to formulate how i do it and got nowhere  
  23. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from arceusdrago in Pick a (WoT) Topic for Kolni to write about   
    oh no the shitlord joined my thread, sorry guys im out not gonna write content for this mongoloid
  24. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from arceusdrago in Pick a (WoT) Topic for Kolni to write about   
    I'll give it til march 4th to see what's come out on top and then start writing those topics up
  25. Upvote
    kolni got a reaction from arceusdrago in Tier 10 Struggles (response to Snoregasm)   
    I'll go through them tomorrow! Still trying to figure out how to break your topic into substance in a way that doesn't super ridiculously elitist or just incoherent gibberish
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