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Daerlon

Verified Tanker [NA]
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  1. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from RGM79GM in Patch 1.0 - HD Maps and other things   
    No, we think Type 5 is fine as is. We may buff it after analyzing more statistics, since they are easily outplayed by TVP VTU's.
  2. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from sohojacques in Patch 1.0 - HD Maps and other things   
    No, we think Type 5 is fine as is. We may buff it after analyzing more statistics, since they are easily outplayed by TVP VTU's.
  3. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from Medjed in Patch 1.0 - HD Maps and other things   
    No, we think Type 5 is fine as is. We may buff it after analyzing more statistics, since they are easily outplayed by TVP VTU's.
  4. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from ZXrage in Patch 1.0 - HD Maps and other things   
    No, we think Type 5 is fine as is. We may buff it after analyzing more statistics, since they are easily outplayed by TVP VTU's.
  5. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from hiipanda in Patch 1.0 - HD Maps and other things   
    No, we think Type 5 is fine as is. We may buff it after analyzing more statistics, since they are easily outplayed by TVP VTU's.
  6. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from Felicius in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  7. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from FavreFan4ever in Do you EVEN 90?   
    I fantasize about a tier 8 AMX ELC bis with 288 standard pen and 390 alpha damage. But with awesome gun handling. 10+ degrees of gun depression? And maybe some trollishly angled frontal armor.
    Oh well, we can dream.

  8. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from monjardin in Do you EVEN 90?   
    I fantasize about a tier 8 AMX ELC bis with 288 standard pen and 390 alpha damage. But with awesome gun handling. 10+ degrees of gun depression? And maybe some trollishly angled frontal armor.
    Oh well, we can dream.

  9. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from RealBattousai in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  10. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from KnobbyHobbGoblin in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  11. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from sohojacques in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  12. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from Archaic_One in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  13. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from SmurfReroll in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  14. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from RC_Tank in Tips on playing heavies for a light tank driver   
    It's not actually that different. The armor and pen that heavy tanks get are backups to good timing and positioning. A bad heavy tank driver will go "to the proper spot" regardless of the enemy team's composition and deployment. Then they'll sit there and reload thinking that their armor is supposed to work (surprise, it doesn't - give your enemy opportunity and time to aim, and you will get penned). Mobility and situational awareness is your armor. Even in a big slow heavy, use what mobility you have to be safe while you're reloading and make yourself as big a pain as you can for the enemy to deal with. When you can push, push hard and recognize situations where you can bully. Staying alive to the end game will give you 10x more opportunities for easy pens and damage than sitting in a lane trying and failing to pen an E3 frontally. 
    Just as if you were in a light tank, think about where you can go that won't lock you down. Even in a heavy tank, you need to still be able to react to a changing situation. If you push forward to the "proper spot" and the other flank falls, you will probably die without doing much. Though sometimes you need to just sit and wait for a couple minutes for the enemy to do something stupid. Don't try to make stuff happen unless you know you can bully.
    Another thing I've realized is that the initial (new player's) view that the goal is the enemy's base is rarely true. Often the best thing you can do in a heavy tank is clear out the enemies on a flank, then with some decent HP left, go back to your own base to defend. If you're guaranteed to lose a flank, back off and do something productive where you can.
    Many maps (or all?) are deathtraps if you "win a flank" and then push across the open area where the inevitable camping TD's can wreck you with impunity. You can do it if you have a strong steamroll going and lots of help with you, but if it's close and you've bled out a lot, pushing across a kill zone is not going to be productive. Few games are won by capping, but the ones which are could have been prevented if some heavies had managed their first engagement better and were able to return to their own base in time.
     
  15. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from Psycxo in Psycxo's highlights and replays   
    Your timing and positioning are a thing of beauty. Will watch more.
  16. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from TAdoo87 in WoTLabs now uses XVM's WN8 Expected Values   
    Never Lives! Long live Never!
  17. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to Never in WoTLabs now uses XVM's WN8 Expected Values   
    For continued updates and inclusion of the newer tanks, WoTLabs has switched to the XVM expected values for the WN8 scores.
    Cheers.
  18. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to Archaic_One in WG is going through with the Obj. 263 changes   
    Badger says hi.
  19. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from TAdoo87 in WoT Encore results!   
    i7 4790k @ 4ghz, 16gb, 750ti gives me about 15,000 on Medium with TSAA. Sorry, uninstalled already and didn't save the screenshots. Honestly I think some of the Ultra level effects (sun flare especially) are distracting and a lot of folks will leave some of those extras off for gameplay reasons.
  20. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to CraBeatOff in Bad habits die hard need help   
    Watch my replays!
  21. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to kolni in Some Metagame Guidelines and Pointers   
    I was thinking about making a thread about some common metagame questions I've learnt to answer during the 4 years I've played this oh so terribly bad game.
    Let's start off with the most common and perhaps the easiest one (at least for me) to answer:
     
    I'm bottom tier - what the hell do I do?
    It's pretty obvious actually. First of all is that you absolutely need to know what your tank excels at and where you can fight tanks that you can excel against and that is just something that comes with experience. After that you need to put it into practice, read the enemy lineup and try and predict where they're going. A lot of people have played the game for many years so some form of intuition should develop here, especially on some maps where the entire thing is really predictable. Take the standard El Halluf, or Erlenberg. It's really easy there. You won't know the exact spot they'll be playing but you should be able to tell what area they're going to be in because like you (hopefully) they're going to what is either meta, or what suits their tank. With this in mind it should become much clearer how areas are going to play out before they have played out, and how aggressive you can be without overdoing it. As a tier 8 in a T10 game this is really important because the amount of opportunities you get to really play anything but 2nd line are few so knowing where these situations are going to open up in advance is the key to being able to be there on time and capitalise. However you're going to be wrong, nobody's perfect and it takes time to get good at, but you'll always misjudge situations or the people you play with/against at times, so the next thing that occurs is that you also need to be able to think on your feet. You should have a sense of what you want to accomplish and a strategy for it, but something happens and it doesn't pan out so you need to rethink the entire thing and start over. Luckily this gets easier and easier as the match progresses because you'll get more and more information to use. Whatever you thought that wasn't right will get corrected as the minimap tells you all the info, so what you thought from the start is rarely what you'll end up doing for more than 2-3 minutes before shifting focus to something different. Stubbornness kills game potential all the time, and so does greed. If something doesn't look favourable, why run straight into it? It's Chess (with some roulette thanks to god almighty SerB) and not CS:GO. The clutch potential in this game is so incredibly low that you're simply better off doing nothing than doing something bad, especially when you're playing against tanks that are most likely stronger than yours. Gameplay has sped up quite a bit in just a year as I personally feel the average battle time has gone down by at least 45 seconds (probably a minute) but you still have plenty of time to rethink and make a different move on whatever new info you got. This is why full on aggression doesn't work; it's blind. Obviously in situations where you're supposed to be outmatched you need to play more passively because mistakes end up more dangerous.
     
    I'll take the 110 for a few examples since it's a tank that's been an issue for many people lately (at least here on labs):
    Bottom tier as 3-5-7 on Serene Coast, south spawn:
    You're useless, right? You can't fight heavies on the peninsula because your pen is lacking, and C1 is a gamble that's seemingly 50/50 (which is why I've stopped going there almost completely regardless of the tank I play). Both main areas aren't great situations for you no matter what happens. C1 is probably the best bet here but your mediums are going to outpace you both in mobility and DPM so what you'll end up doing is mostly useless driving if they win it, and if they don't then you're committed and 100% going to die also doing close to nothing. The odd game where it stalemates and you might be able to use your armour a bit might happen but is that really something you're going to commit to? The stars aligning? Of course not. Stay passive. I normally end up redlining with the TDs. You can't really impact either of these situations directly but what you can do is simply getting whatever free shots you can, and think about the progression. Where's your team winning vis-a-vis losing? Just after 2 minutes your options should open up much better. I normally end up crossing down into the bowl only to drive up as I see that my team most likely end up winning C1. I'm now ahead for the next situation and while there's damage I lost out on, I'm now in a much better position to keep up. TD shots should open up either through myself or through the mediums closing in. Afterwards you're better positioned to deal with whatever tanks are left. It might not be a great game, but as a tier 8 in a tier10 game even 2000 damage games that are considered low for the tryhards is still more than alright. I can personally attest to that settling for safer plays that don't net you as much will help you in the long run. Risky plays rarely work out 100% the way you wanted so just don't push the odds.
     
    If they don't win it then I'm still in a much better position to react, because I'm not dead. Simple as that. Then it's all about figuring out where you can go, the game is likely to be lost because C1 was lost. However the everything to win mentality is a bit stupid, as a tier 8 on that area you're really not going to make much of a difference regardless of player skill. I'm not saying that you should accept the loss, but if they're going to win that flank then why give your tank away as well?
     
    Bottom tier 5-10 on Steppes, south spawn:
    Once again, you're going to struggle and pen the heavies on the 1-2 line. The main decider will be what you'll think will come out of the east engagement, if you're likely to win it then you should commit to it. It gives tons of area control and usually ends up winning the map (just as C1 on Serene Coast) so it's obviously important, but the same thing applies here. If the odds are stacked against you then don't go there. Simple as that. The progression on Steppes especially makes it really hard to come back once you've lost areas, or really defending anywhere, so just reinforce wherever your chances are the greatest of winning. 1-2 isn't as good for winning, but it's not without enough terrain to allow you to fight it, you're stuck with a slower fight against tougher targets but your chances of winning and having progression from there on instead of a burning wreckage are still better off with you alive. I can't really help with the progression because it's different every game. If that doesn't work out either then why not just camp it. If I see 2 minutes in and that the enemy mediums have completely control over 9-0 already and that might my team is losing the heavy lane I'm going to drive up the K-line and redline like a piece of shit because that's about as useful I can be. Playing for the win is stupid when you don't have the factors to go through with it, you're going to basically throw yourself away for nothing anyway. With a score of let's say 1-8 and you should be running full chai redline mode in pretty much anything already. You still have a decent chance of increasing your damage output for that game as long as you're alive and uncommitted, but the second you commit somewhere where you're likely to lose you've basically just decided to add to the bonfire of what used to be your team.
     
    On the other hand, if you actually have a winning progression (unlikely that this is the common problem) then passivity is the worst thing you can do. Even as a bottom tier. The second you have teammates to work with and tanks to outplay through terrain, vision or through numbers then the second you're not there you're going to lose out. I personally have this issue because I'm so focused on minimizing my losses rather than maximize my profits. Basically the shittier your tank is for the MM and map the more important it is to know where you have to be well ahead of time so you actually be there and capitalize.

     
    Playing bad tanks
    Similar to playing bottom tier, coming from an inferior position into an engagement means you’ll have to cut corners. Minmaxing really disappears when your tank won’t really let you play what you’re comfortable with. Obvious example is the Churchill GC, considered as one of the worst tanks in the game. You have two workable attributes but everything else is worse than pretty much every tank you’re going to face. So how do you use it effectively?
    In this particular case your gun is the one trait where you really excel compared to your teammates. You have very high penetration and some gun handling + depression to help with poking. Where are you useful? This is as simple as it gets, basically as long as you’re in a position to keep shooting you’re going to be useful because your gun is potent. The drawback is that you can’t just yolo in, you have no armour and you’re slow so if they can shoot back at you then you’ll not be able to shoot for very long. Snipe it out. Move up accordingly when you can progress and you can probably move up to 2nd line when you have info. Playing safe in a tank like this is all the more important because once you’re in over your head your mobility and armour won’t be able to help you bail out. What you need to accept is that you probably won’t be able to hold your standards and go in with a decently open mindset. Your capabilities of good games are lower than normal so frustration from a poor tank just adds to the fire that is a tilt from all the other circumstances as teammates, RNG, artillery and whatever else. Identify what your tank is good at and try to utilize that strength at all costs because you can’t really be effective any other way. If your gun is your only good asset then I recommend that you stay back, and if you’re in a tank who is only considered armoured to same tiers and below (O-Ni) then you simply have to give up the map control. You can’t fight tier 9 heavies at all, so why bother? Rely on info and find tanks you can actually bully and take it from there. Once the map opens up at a bit more you have a lot more options so you just going to places where you can actually fight without getting outtraded 3 to 1 is a really good start. Armour is very relative from game to game pretty much regardless of the tank you play so when the odds are stacked against you trying to use it is pointless. Play against tanks you know you have an advantage against, whether it’s numbers, HP, skill, terrain and so on. Seize the opportunities as they come, because you’re at a disadvantage from the start meaning you have to find ways to level the playing field before being able to engage and actively contribute to winning games even in the most awful of tanks.


     
    Playing general tanks
    There’s a general playstyle that most top players try and adapt most tanks to, it should follow the meta very well and there’s a lot of tanks that play very similarly in the broad sense and only really differ in certain situations, even though their armour, HP, DPM and alpha might be different. What is probably the most important here is the mobility, as in you want to know where you can be at what times, a lot of tanks luckily move at around 50km/h at tier 10 so you can normally get to the positions you’d want to in another tank. Russian mediums, heavies and chinese ones share a lot of traits together. You can play them almost identically in a macro sense but where the good players really stand out is in the micro play here. All tanks generally have at least one unique trait to their combo of stats (IS-7 has it’s turret, M48 has on the move handling, russian mediums have their DPM and so on) so the doing the small things really matter. An IS-7 benefits from hulldown much more than any tank in the game because it’s almost invincible until pushed, but place a 140 there and it’ll be the same thing. Not because of it’s turret but because of the fact that it can dish out much more damage instead, at the risk of taking damage. Similarities arise and using them to recognise a playstyle that you’re familiar with means a lot and by doing so you’re going to be more seasoned in what you’re likely to be able to accomplish. Just by recognising traits that should work out similarly even though they might be different in other situations (IS-7 is for example much better at tanking hits, and can initiate pushes much better, where a 140 really need teammates to snowball with in a push) will help you play much better. Recognising where they differ and being able to swap in to a committed play that is good for your specific tank from a general play will make you an even better one. By learning this and being able to do it well you’re going to win much more. If there’s a situation where you recognise that you can commit to it’ll help your team much more, and you’ll develop some confidence in your micro ability along the way. Macro play takes much longer to learn, but it’s something that should already be on good progress because it’s something that happens every game. Playing mostly mediums/fast heavies help with learning this, as they’re the ones that are the most similar. A Maus and an IS-7 also share traits so there’s something you can draw from having played the one to the other, and so on and so on until you’ve developed a decent ability and a general sense of macro play as a whole.
     
    Playing specialized tanks
    For this I recommend you throw everything above out the window, because while playing very niché tanks it won’t work. Autoloaders and turretless TDs are the most common ones, as they simply can’t play as a single shot and turreted tank. So how do you get around it? As with anything else, identify what your tank is good at and know your limits. If you have no experience with what you're playing then it's going to be a rough ride because you'll misplay constantly. Being turretless means you want as slow games as possible in long lanes where you can keep being effective no matter if the enemy team is pushing or falling back, and with relatively low risk of getting punished. Some maps have these spots and they're broken. It's ideal for a turretless TD but it's also horrible for gameplay because it requires zero effort. On the maps where you actually need to have a brain to really be effective then you have to create crossfires and long lanes on your own. No matter how the game's progressing there's usually a position you could be in that would have shots, and with limited gun arcs you need to see these things coming. A slow push from heavies will net a T10 TD two shots, meaning anywhere from 1000 to 2000 damage, so being there and ready for it is the most important part about it. If you're playing far back already then you can keep falling back and make those two shots into three or four, and that damage should matter and hopefully contribute to a closer game. TDs are the most useful on the losing end, and so their snowball ability is low along with their carry potential, but what they're really good at is stalling and counters so I really suggest that this is something you do often. There are a lot of useless TD players, and most of them are simply clueless but there's something to the passive gameplay that helps TDs since playing close up mean that if a tank gets on your side there's very little you can do to retaliate. Playing far back and low risk is the only way to really ensure your safety, but what differs the good from the bad is that you're hopefully going to play in the right places. Generally TDs work much better on a losing flank than a winning one, so trying to lock down the losing lane rather than help to push the winning one should be a much better option, even if you're going to die eventually. In blitz play this becomes more complicated as you can't be effective for very long unless you have teammates around you that make you hard to push, and so your options are reduced to either going on the lemming train or staying at the back of it. From there on it's really just a matter of preference and what comfort. I personally like to move up because camping is boring, and it can certainly work out but most times I'm sure the defensive play would have been the better one.
     
    Stalling an enemy push lets your team gain map control and lets the game progress everywhere around you but where you're currently locking down, that's the ideal situation for a TD and how to benefit from upsides that come with downside of being turretless. 
     
    When it comes to autoloaders it's a bit nicer however, as you're normally decently mobile and it lets you macro like normal. But once it comes to actually engaging it's totally different as playing an autoloader means you have to be the most selfish piece of shit wherever you engage. Don't take hits. You're biggest asset is your clip and if your team keeps you alive you can keep capitalizing on every situation much better than your teammates can. They've got the edge on macro play and for slower games but when it comes to a head on engagement you're going to shave off enemy HP much faster than anyone else, a result of your teammates taking the hits for you so you can speed up the engagement and increase your chances of a positive outcome. I'm not even joking as in if you can't trade at least triple what you'll take then it is not a good engagement in an autoloader. You run constant risk of getting rushed whenever on reload and you have serious downtime where your teammates can catch up, especially if you're moving for crossfires and get caught in mid reload before getting into position. Your HP should be an asset of getting an extra shot off for taking a hit, or for moving in for better positioning but you shouldn't take hits that teammates could have. Your tank has more value and as the game progresses it becomes more dangerous. An autoloader in a game where it's just 7v7 left means a lot less area control mean movement and ability to single out targets come by much more often. Autoloaders excel at this because once you get to these situations there's very little one can do against an autoloader with a full clip, your going to take the damage and the odds are that you won't deal nearly as much in return. In the case of BC25t it's very likely that you're not full HP anymore and that it'll be able to clip you out and kill you for very little damage taken in return. So stay alive, don't take hits and hit your shots. Autoloaders are generally described as hard to play but they really aren't. They're different but the gameplay basically boils down to the same as it always does; how good you are at reading the engagements and knowing where to be. Once you get the hang of that then anything should click with you once you're comfortable enough to factor in your tank into that as well. 

     
    Digging out a camp
    https://www.twitch.tv/videos/188016992
    Here's a pretty good example. I'll walk you through the entire thing,
    First off, reading the map and MM. The team comps are really standard and shouldn't really be an issue. Most likely some idiot will be left alone on the the west side of the river like normal so there should be some damage to farm there. But there's not. What's important however is that the enemy team skipped out on pushing the 9-0 and just went straight to middle. That IS-7 is really hard to dig out without arty in the game and pretty much denies my normal play on the map (win west, cross mid and play outside the 9-0 line for a solid win) so we're currently stuck. I don't know what to do. What's good however is that while we can't really do anything, the enemy team's not exactly doing anything but baby steps either. TVP is staying passive, so is the JgPz, Tortoise is obviously going to die for free and so is the Mod1 as they're both way too exposed and easy to shoot once 9-0 is won. This does leave me some time in the north to just wait it out and see what shots I have, only 2 minutes have passed. Patience paid off. VKB pokes side out so I can do something productive while the IS-7 is currently winning the game for the enemy team. I pay a lot of attention to that IS-7 because if he dies then we can still win this. At this time the CDC and 12 t finally crossed over. So I have to go back. We're stuck on our side and can't let them get control of that. Thankfully the T25 Pilot is doing gods work and deny them the area. 
    Here's where the magic happens: I now have a play where I can finally cross over, grant my team vision without any real danger. TVP is camping, IS-7 is in middle and the JGPZ is most likely defending the base. The amount of tanks that are actually here are limited so this is a risk I can take. 215b is following which is helpful. Their camp is now broken. I have an angle on their IS-7 now that he can't really get out of. I waste some of my HP to get him out. But he's down. The camp is broken. My team can cross over now. The kicker is that it took too long. The IS-7 bought them so much time that we have a minute to clean out 5 tanks. Never going to happen. Especially after the JgPz pins me down. He goes down eventually but it's also costing the only time I have to work with. This is an issue with assault games in general, but I picked this one because the real play is pretty easy to spot, and identifying a problem and then doing what's necessary to try and solve it. This was obviously getting that IS-7 down. It obviously took too long to do it, but the reason it worked is because of the information I had to work with that wouldn't have been available beforehand. I would've run into a 12 t and a CDC, most likely wound up killed by the two french autoloader heavies. 
    When it comes to digging out a camp you need to find where you can press so hard that it'll break. It's a camp after all so you should have plenty of time doing so considering that enemy team is generally not going to move anywhere. Information that is 2 minutes old is most likely still pretty accurate. You just need to think past the first engagement. I knew I was going to fight tanks crossing over, maybe even take damage. I knew I had to to get sideshots on the IS-7 because no one else did, and this game it was what broke the camp by denying the enemy team the vision of middle so we could close in. Every camp has a flaw, use the time and their passivity to your favour and find it. It's there somewhere. 
     
    That’s all for now. Thanks for reading,
    Kolni
     
    REMOVE_XVM_FROM_THE_GAME
  22. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to kolni in Best days - time to play for MM?   
    That's called snowballing and your better results might have less to do with "you" than you think. When a team is doing good things it's much easier to progress and benefit from it, what's much harder is to try and capitalize when that doesn't happen. 
    I had a 4K WN8 30 session back when I was a pretty much blue player in the BC25t. I felt like I was playing ridiculously good, but looking back on it I know that I wasn't. A bit of luck, a bit of decent teammates and maps all play their role in basically making you a better player than normal, or a worse player than normal if you put it the other way around. 
     
    Turning a losing team into a winning one is probably one of the most valuable qualities a player can have, and those players actively help others play better just by doing that. Enabling your teammates is something I consider all the time and let's go down memory lane and look at how Garbad and MaxL played the game. No doubt that the game has changed but personal performance aside in numbers isn't all that matters. When you have a player who not only considers himself but his teammates and what they can do for him and for the team everyone ends up playing better. That's pretty much how it works. 
    If you look closer on those replays from the good days you'll probably see that your teams progress much better in general rather than only your own performance. I still see my sessions spiking up to 6k rather than the usual 4,5-5  whenever my teammates do what I want them to. 
  23. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to DeinFreund in How to get started with the meth (API, Datasets?)   
    It is only based on winning, just like win rate. But winrate is pretty much the most jittery rating you can get, needing thousands of games to average out its errors. It's also susceptible to platooning or WG manipulating the Matchmaker to not be random.
    Elo is the basic step-up. Instead of only considering whether you won or not, it'll also check your enemies and allies. If you play with a strong team (possibly caused by platooning), you'll only earn little reward for winning. If you play against a strong team, you'll only lose little on a defeat and gain a lot on a victory. Everybody starts at the same rating, and over time it'll get a good approximate of each player's influence on winning games. TrueSkill, Glicko and WHR are all improvements based on the same idea. I wouldn't worry too much about bottom/center/top tier, I've seen similar things have little impact in other games. Especially with the new MM it shouldn't be much of an issue.
    Not incorporating any in-game stats is part of the foundation of all these ratings. Once you start rewarding other things than winning, there are always loopholes and uncovered cases. So in short, these systems would be a possible replacement for winrate that reduce impact of platooning and bad MM. It could be applied per-tank, per-tier or per-player. I am doubtful whether WG actually provides the API required for such ratings though. The rating could still be used for sites where you upload your battle history.
    I think I've seen some similar topics before, so I expected this to be a familiar sight. Because I already have the code to test it, I thought I'd just give it a go if you have some data sets available.
  24. Upvote
    Daerlon reacted to SmyleeRage in What do I do with my losing streak   
    Just from a quick look at your overall stats I can tell quite a few things that would overall improve your performance.
    1. Take a break or switch servers when losing 3-4 games in a row because once the losing streak has started it's easier to keep it rolling than stopping it by continuously playing in hopes of winning continuously mostly due to the fact your state of mind has darkened from those loses you will start thinking differently or even lose focus/sight of things you would easily read in a calming state. 
    2. Their are two tanks you have a positive winrate in with more than 200 battles Rudy & T26E4 why is that do you play these tanks any differently maybe like them more than your others?
    3.  Tank choice! This is really important considering you are still quite new to the game the fact that you choose the TVP as your first tier 10 was probably are really big mistake, This tank requires quite a lot of skill/experince to play even decent let alone amazingly, It has no armor and is top tier in a meta of super heavies and you're still new so all of this combined together really equals your winrate in a nutshell after looking through and thinking about everything it really makes sense why your win rate is so low.
    #3 is not to insult you I'm just stating facts I've been coaching people in this game for almost 3 years now and tbh all this looks like to me is wrong line choices you are going down the E100/Type 5 lines and just finished your TVP line all three of these lines IMO are not good for beginners at this game I recommend something like the Russian/American Medium/Heavy lines would be better these lines are better at flexing have a enough armor to work with and good guns unlike the lines you have been grinding two of them E100/Type 5 can't flex which means if you make a mistake deploying in the beginning of the match you've already personally lost and the TVP is a high ceiling glass cannon that even I still haven't Mastered fully Please rethink your tank lines and maybe not play your tvp until you have actually played more tier 8-9 games I don't recommend people even touch their tier 10s as much as you had under 10k battles unless they're highly gifted at this game Tier 10 is really hard and it takes quite sometime to get into pace yourself or else you will end up quitting  out of frustration like so many others not understanding that 5K battles in this game is nothing compared to the average 30k people have now a days.
     
    Sorry don't have time for grammar I'm quite busy just looked at this post and felt I needed to put my 0.02 in
  25. Upvote
    Daerlon got a reaction from hazzgar in Supertest 9.20: German Tank Changes (Maus nerf)   
    My problem with the Maus/Mauschen is just that they're so incredibly boring to play.
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