Deusmortis

Deus goes to Iowa

18 posts in this topic

The ship of course, not the boring state it's named after.  It's taking me too long to get one in game, so I figured I'd go see the real thing.  Some highlights:

 

Maybe BBs are the real sea cancer?

lDBH7Yv.jpg

The Big Guns

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Prem ammo idea:  Nuclear Shell Mk 23 "Katie"

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That one bounced!

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Which one activates Damage Control Party?

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Upgrade idea:  Historical 4x Phalanx weapon systems.  If they can shoot down missiles, they can shoot down torp bombers.

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Upgrade idea #2:  Tomahawk and Harpoon missiles.

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Shoot the blue areas to Citadel:

zHZHFwD.jpg

 

Full album:

http://imgur.com/a/DoDKv#mtLDNML

 

 

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Those gun barrels are surprisingly low and close to the deck... The Big Mamie had a higher turret position compared to this. 

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Yeah.  Bottom of the barrel is 4-5 feet off the deck.

Some interesting bits I learned while out there:

Crew housing was cots on chains, stacked 5 high.  Airflow was poor, so many of the crew chose to sleep out on the deck.  

Iowa has a separate Flag Bridge, intended for admirals and such.

Two AA mounts on top of the #2 turret were left off, in order to provide clear vision from the Flag Bridge.

She also has a presidential suite.

Only the captain, XO, and dignitaries had private rooms.  Not quite as bad as a sub, but still cramped quarters.

The current barrels on the 16s are upgrades.  The originals were sold for scrap.  There's a picture of the rifling in the full album.  That section came from one of the original barrels, but isn't actually owned by the museum.  

One of the most welcome cold war upgrades?  Air conditioning.

Each main turret requires just under 50 crew to operate.  

 

It was an interesting thing to see, overall.  I have to say, though, the battleship museum in Alabama was much better.  Iowa's tour is very restrictive.  Alabama's tour let you get into the #3 turret, and get down into the power plant.  Having the parking lot so close made it impossible to get a good profile shot.

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Very cool, I'm hoping to go out to the USS North Carolina this fall with my wife and son, I'm so looking forward to it, later when my son gets old enough I plan to head back to my home state with him (NJ) to see the USS New Jersey too

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Some interesting bits I learned while out there:

Crew housing was cots on chains, stacked 5 high.  Airflow was poor, so many of the crew chose to sleep out on the deck. 

    Only the captain, XO, and dignitaries had private rooms.  Not quite as bad as a sub, but still cramped quarters.

I'm not super familiar with the more modern ships, but most early era ships, by this I mean the ones still in service in the early 2000s, used this style of bedding, the cots on chains or rope cots. Navy side may have had overhauls to the 'coffin rack' style, but troop bedding was usually stacked 4-5 high with a cot woven with rope onto a metal tube frame. An upgrade to this was a thin mattress.

FYI, sleeping out on the deck on a blacked out ship for night operations is scary as shit when you know that they'll probably never find you if you were to fall overboard. We would sneak out the O-2 Level at night and climb up into the Phalanx (maybe, it looked just like that at least) retrofit system well to smoke and I remember us having to literally navigate by touch and hope the ship didn't rock too far in stormy waters to throw us over the braided steel ropes that made up the handrail system. You don't do that too many times before you find inventive ways to steal a smoke break that don't involve the inky black night.

Most ships I were on had the same restrictions for private rooms. Officers were bunked two to a room and I think the Chiefs were pretty similar in a minimum of two to a space, if not more. I never was put on a detail into Chief/Staff country and I only visited the O-Levels for a duty shift or if I needed to act as a runner for our Lt. I would assume only carrier size ships give the luxury of individual quarters for the lower officer ranks?

Ships that were put into service later would have coffin racks with the cloth drapes to provide 'privacy'. Spend time in the hole on a troop carrier and then the open bays of an LHA with it's coffin racks is palatial. Seriously. It's like smurfberries and rainbows all day, every day.

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Very cool, I'm hoping to go out to the USS North Carolina this fall with my wife and son, I'm so looking forward to it, later when my son gets old enough I plan to head back to my home state with him (NJ) to see the USS New Jersey too

I drive by NJ quite often.  In fact, I'll be doing it in a few hours.  Sadly, I can't quite see it from the highway.  

 

I'm not super familiar with the more modern ships, but most early era ships, by this I mean the ones still in service in the early 2000s, used this style of bedding, the cots on chains or rope cots. Navy side may have had overhauls to the 'coffin rack' style, but troop bedding was usually stacked 4-5 high with a cot woven with rope onto a metal tube frame. An upgrade to this was a thin mattress.

Not sure on other ships, but the refitted Iowa had the coffin racks with the "privacy" curtain.  Only other modern ship I've toured was a Nimitz class carrier, and it had 6 man dorm rooms.  Though, that might have been for pilots.  It was a while ago, I've forgotten all of the details.  

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So, funny story about the Phalanx system. It wouldn't be good against waves of torpedo bombers.

The system was designed to shoot down missiles, which it does relatively against cruiser missiles and very, very haphazardly against anything that used a parabolic attack vector (so, Harpoon missiles and all the clones). The problem is, the way they defend against those threats is super ammo intensive. Literal wall of lead stuff.

There's the infamous story of Admiral van Ripen attacking the Persian gulf fleet in a naval exercise using Cessnas, motor boats and any thing else that floated or flew, and 'sinking' the carrier before it even got started. Why? Because those Phalanxes run out of ammo. And then? Then you're a 1940s warship that's easy to burn, easy to sink. (Google "u sank my carrier" by the war nerd. Ignore his antagonistic tone, read the research).

But yeah, the Phalanx would annihilate the first couple of waves of bombers, and then you'd sit there and take 'em.

 

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But this is WoWS, where you have infinite ammo.

BRRRRRRRRT x infinity

Load them up with HE and they can be your secondaries.

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Oh god Pom Poms in Navyfield were like that. You could actually use them to kill enemy crew in droves if you were feeling spiteful (veteran crew had to be endlessly ground out or bought because Korean "fuck you" monetisation). 

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It was an interesting thing to see, overall.  I have to say, though, the battleship museum in Alabama was much better.  Iowa's tour is very restrictive.  Alabama's tour let you get into the #3 turret, and get down into the power plant.  Having the parking lot so close made it impossible to get a good profile shot.

This is because Iowa is a relatively young ship museum... I don't think it got to its current berth until ~3 years ago. There's a lot of hazmat stuff below decks that needs millions of dollars to clean up before they can let tourist in those areas... stuff like lead paint and asbestos. I've been to the Iowa, the Wisconsin, and the Missouri; and  the Missouri is the only one where extensive areas of the lower decks has been cleaned up for viewing by the general public; and that's only because Disney put in millions of dollars into it so they can film "Pearl Harbor" in the lower decks.

If you are ever out at Pearl Harbor, the long tour of the Missouri is highly recommended...the highlight of the tour, in my opinion, was the plotting room where you had a house size analogue computer that plotted the firing solution for both the 16" and 5" guns. The computer also plotted the firing solution against air targets as well for the 5" guns.

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Yeah.  Bottom of the barrel is 4-5 feet off the deck.

Some interesting bits I learned while out there:

Crew housing was cots on chains, stacked 5 high.  Airflow was poor, so many of the crew chose to sleep out on the deck.  

Iowa has a separate Flag Bridge, intended for admirals and such.

Two AA mounts on top of the #2 turret were left off, in order to provide clear vision from the Flag Bridge.

She also has a presidential suite.

Only the captain, XO, and dignitaries had private rooms.  Not quite as bad as a sub, but still cramped quarters.

The current barrels on the 16s are upgrades.  The originals were sold for scrap.  There's a picture of the rifling in the full album.  That section came from one of the original barrels, but isn't actually owned by the museum.  

One of the most welcome cold war upgrades?  Air conditioning.

Each main turret requires just under 50 crew to operate.  

 

It was an interesting thing to see, overall.  I have to say, though, the battleship museum in Alabama was much better.  Iowa's tour is very restrictive.  Alabama's tour let you get into the #3 turret, and get down into the power plant.  Having the parking lot so close made it impossible to get a good profile shot.

I found the fighting bridge armor to be quite impressive.  It'd probably be difficult to get a proper picture of the cylinder of armor that thick but to see it in person was quite impressive.  

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Iowa has a separate Flag Bridge, intended for admirals and such.

 

The Flag Bridges are to keep Battle Control separate from Ship Control. Many of the Bad Decisions(tm) made by the IJN about 1/2 through the Battle of Midway can be attributed to the fact that the Admiral in command was on a ship that was on fire and busy fighting that fire.... the chaos of that sort of distracted the Admiral from doing his job. (Because he was sharing a bridge with the guy actually driving the ship...and at that point... fighting a fire... a big fire.) 

 

Americans did a lot of dumb things in WW-I and WW-II.... but we usually only did that dumb thing once. We quickly learned that Battle Control must be separate from Ship Control. (In fact, the Flag Bridge is the only place the Captain of the ship has to ask permission to enter)

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