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TheLovePanda

What I have learned about playing well over the past 4+ years

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I wanted to make this to share with whoever is interested what I have learned about playing well in tanks over the past 4ish years. I play almost exclusively solo, so bear in mind this is from the perspective of a solo pubber. These are my OPINIONS, so take from them what you will.

***

There are a few factors which contribute to consistent good play and I have listed them below in order of importance:

 

Factor 1: Positioning

 

70+% of playing at a unicum or superunicum level solo is positioning. The other 20ish% is comprised primarily of map awareness, and this is all brought together by you knowing how to play your tank from a mechanics perspective.

 

Positioning is not only about knowing the good spots. While knowing where to go in general is good, your positioning should be heavily influenced by the tank composition of your own team and especially that of the enemy team. You need to know where the enemy is going to be before they are lit based on what tanks they’re driving and their level of skill.

 

More than this, you need to base where you are going to go at the beginning of the match based on where your own team is going. Heroism in this game gets you nowhere except an early, shallow grave. Do not be a hero. If you do not have the support you require from your team to be successful in the position you want to go to, don't go. You will die early and you will not be able to contribute to the match in a meaningful way.

 

Factor 2: Taking responsibility

 

We have all played matches where pubs cry about their team doing this or that and that’s why they lost the match. Do not do this.

 

If you lose, you need to be thinking “what could I have done better to win?” If you die early, you need to be thinking “what did I do wrong to die early and not contribute to the match?”

 

Take responsibility for your failures. I hear so much “I’m only 1 tank out of 15! How can I influence the battle at all?” You need to believe that you not only can influence the match, but that you are the only one who can influence the match.

 

Assume everyone else will choke to death on their own saliva before they will get their HP in damage or assist you in any way. Your teammates are liabilities. It’s 1 against 29 out there.

 

It’s ok to fail. Don’t beat yourself up. Take responsibility, learn from it, do better next match.

 

Factor 3: Don’t be afraid to experiment (and learn)

 

No, this is not sexual innuendo. For every map there are set channels where you are expected to go based on your tank type.

 

Examples:

  • You are playing a TD. You should sit back and move forward when your team has cleaned up.

  • You are playing a heavy, you need to go into town and rub dicks with the enemy heavies.

  • You are playing a medium, you need to go into the field and hunt scouts/be on the outskirts of the battle.

 

These expectations are lies. You need to go where you think you are going to contribute the best to the match, regardless of what anyone else thinks.

 

Are you playing a heavy? Go field. Are you playing a medium? Go city.

 

Experimenting is a key factor of playing well because from this you learn what’s true about good positioning and what’s bullshit. You will learn fast by experimenting with different strategies and positions because if you made a poor decision you will die early or be ineffective.

 

As I said before, there is nothing wrong with failing as long as you learn from it and use that knowledge to do better next time.

 

The main upside to experimenting with new strategies is that you find out quickly what works and what doesn’t and you become a better player for it fast.

 

Factor 4: Getting early damage

 

Getting early damage is one of the key ways you can contribute to a match for a number of reasons:

  1. You will get the upper hand in the match quickly by damaging enemy tanks before the real battle begins

  2. You will throw the enemy off their game. If a pub gets shot early on in the match it will lower their self esteem and immediately put thoughts in their head like “oh it’s going to be another loss.” This is a huge advantage for you. If the enemy is intimidated they will make mistakes, which you will capitalize on for massive damage and wins.

  3. You will know enemy positions early. You should already have a map in your mind of where they are going to be, but solidifying that knowledge is key to making your next move.

 

In my opinion, if you are not dealing damage to the enemy within the first 60 seconds of the match you might not be doing what you should.

 

Factor 5: Know your mechanics!

 

Knowing how to play your own tank is important, but you will hopefully have become proficient at driving a new tank within the first 50 battles or so. However, what matters hugely across every tank type and tier and in every match you play is knowing basic and advanced game mechanics like spotting, angling, overmatching, ammo types, tracking, circle jerking, blind firing, etc.

 

Every tank has different gun and armor combinations. Knowing that you can overmatch the turret of the T34 and T29 with your 122mm gun can mean the difference between a win and a loss. Knowing that you can’t sidescrape effectively with your particular heavy tank can mean the difference between a win and a loss. Knowing that you should fire HE at a waffle for maximum damage can mean the difference between a win and a loss.

 

The list goes on. If you don’t know basic or advanced mechanics, educate yourself. You will learn a ton and be able to apply this knowledge to real situations. Most pubs do not know this stuff. Use it to your advantage.

 

Factor 6: Don’t get stuck

 

A huge part of being able to carry a match is staying alive as long as possible while dealing maximum damage. This means you need to know when to fight a battle and when to run away.

 

As I said before, you do not get points for being a hero in this game. There are no medals for staying to fight 6 enemy heavies by yourself and dying early.

 

Do not fight battles you know you are going to lose!

 

If you feel that you are not going to win the battle you are fighting, back off, run away, live to fight another day. You will get more damage and kills and possibly be able to carry.

 

Your teammates will yell at you for abandoning them. They will call you nasty names. Don’t listen to them. You do you. You can win this match, they can’t.

 

A big part of this factor is not going to positions where you cannot run away. There are a number of spots that are popular for certain tank types which, if things do not go as you had planned, there is no escape from. Do not go to these spots unless you are very confident that you can win with your current level of support.

 

Stay alive longer. Win more matches. Simple.

 

Conclusion:

 

There are many other factors which influence matches, but let me tell you this: very rarely in my experience is the outcome of the match out of your control. Every time I lose I can identify several mistakes that I made which may have cost me the match.

 

Being a better player isn’t about not making mistakes, it’s about making fewer, less costly mistakes over time as you learn.

 

These are my two cents. Thanks for reading, and never stop learning and getting better my fellow tankers.

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OP, this thread strikes very close to home as I had those exact considerations and principals in mind when I finally sought light within darkness to reach poor purple quasi-solo.

+1 brownie point/CC: Make content 50% shorter and insert some high resolution screenshots to put power behind words as would a professional poet would do. Share this with the WoT Official Forum since I'll be much easier for them to comprehend a picture book than actual words & profit???

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6 minutes ago, Casas5591 said:

OP, this thread strikes very close to home as I had those exact considerations and principals in mind when I finally sought light within darkness to reach poor purple quasi-solo.

+1 brownie point/CC: Make content 50% shorter and insert some high resolution screenshots to put power behind words as would a professional poet would do. Share this with the WoT Official Forum since I'll be much easier for them to comprehend a picture book than actual words & profit???

Ty for the tips! Perhaps I will adapt this for the official forum if I have time...

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21 hours ago, TheLovePanda said:

 

 

I wanted to make this to share with whoever is interested what I have learned about playing well in tanks over the past 4ish years. I play almost exclusively solo, so bear in mind this is from the perspective of a solo pubber. These are my OPINIONS, so take from them what you will.

***

There are a few factors which contribute to consistent good play and I have listed them below in order of importance:

 

Factor 1: Positioning

 

70+% of playing at a unicum or superunicum level solo is positioning. The other 20ish% is comprised primarily of map awareness, and this is all brought together by you knowing how to play your tank from a mechanics perspective.

 

Positioning is not only about knowing the good spots. While knowing where to go in general is good, your positioning should be heavily influenced by the tank composition of your own team and especially that of the enemy team. You need to know where the enemy is going to be before they are lit based on what tanks they’re driving and their level of skill.

 

More than this, you need to base where you are going to go at the beginning of the match based on where your own team is going. Heroism in this game gets you nowhere except an early, shallow grave. Do not be a hero. If you do not have the support you require from your team to be successful in the position you want to go to, don't go. You will die early and you will not be able to contribute to the match in a meaningful way.

 

Factor 2: Taking responsibility

 

We have all played matches where pubs cry about their team doing this or that and that’s why they lost the match. Do not do this.

 

If you lose, you need to be thinking “what could I have done better to win?” If you die early, you need to be thinking “what did I do wrong to die early and not contribute to the match?”

 

Take responsibility for your failures. I hear so much “I’m only 1 tank out of 15! How can I influence the battle at all?” You need to believe that you not only can influence the match, but that you are the only one who can influence the match.

 

Assume everyone else will choke to death on their own saliva before they will get their HP in damage or assist you in any way. Your teammates are liabilities. It’s 1 against 29 out there.

 

It’s ok to fail. Don’t beat yourself up. Take responsibility, learn from it, do better next match.

 

Factor 3: Don’t be afraid to experiment (and learn)

 

No, this is not sexual innuendo. For every map there are set channels where you are expected to go based on your tank type.

 

Examples:

  • You are playing a TD. You should sit back and move forward when your team has cleaned up.

  • You are playing a heavy, you need to go into town and rub dicks with the enemy heavies.

  • You are playing a medium, you need to go into the field and hunt scouts/be on the outskirts of the battle.

 

These expectations are lies. You need to go where you think you are going to contribute the best to the match, regardless of what anyone else thinks.

 

Are you playing a heavy? Go field. Are you playing a medium? Go city.

 

Experimenting is a key factor of playing well because from this you learn what’s true about good positioning and what’s bullshit. You will learn fast by experimenting with different strategies and positions because if you made a poor decision you will die early or be ineffective.

 

As I said before, there is nothing wrong with failing as long as you learn from it and use that knowledge to do better next time.

 

The main upside to experimenting with new strategies is that you find out quickly what works and what doesn’t and you become a better player for it fast.

 

Factor 4: Getting early damage

 

Getting early damage is one of the key ways you can contribute to a match for a number of reasons:

  1. You will get the upper hand in the match quickly by damaging enemy tanks before the real battle begins

  2. You will throw the enemy off their game. If a pub gets shot early on in the match it will lower their self esteem and immediately put thoughts in their head like “oh it’s going to be another loss.” This is a huge advantage for you. If the enemy is intimidated they will make mistakes, which you will capitalize on for massive damage and wins.

  3. You will know enemy positions early. You should already have a map in your mind of where they are going to be, but solidifying that knowledge is key to making your next move.

 

In my opinion, if you are not dealing damage to the enemy within the first 60 seconds of the match you might not be doing what you should.

 

Factor 5: Know your mechanics!

 

Knowing how to play your own tank is important, but you will hopefully have become proficient at driving a new tank within the first 50 battles or so. However, what matters hugely across every tank type and tier and in every match you play is knowing basic and advanced game mechanics like spotting, angling, overmatching, ammo types, tracking, circle jerking, blind firing, etc.

 

Every tank has different gun and armor combinations. Knowing that you can overmatch the turret of the T34 and T29 with your 122mm gun can mean the difference between a win and a loss. Knowing that you can’t sidescrape effectively with your particular heavy tank can mean the difference between a win and a loss. Knowing that you should fire HE at a waffle for maximum damage can mean the difference between a win and a loss.

 

The list goes on. If you don’t know basic or advanced mechanics, educate yourself. You will learn a ton and be able to apply this knowledge to real situations. Most pubs do not know this stuff. Use it to your advantage.

 

Factor 6: Don’t get stuck

 

A huge part of being able to carry a match is staying alive as long as possible while dealing maximum damage. This means you need to know when to fight a battle and when to run away.

 

As I said before, you do not get points for being a hero in this game. There are no medals for staying to fight 6 enemy heavies by yourself and dying early.

 

Do not fight battles you know you are going to lose!

 

If you feel that you are not going to win the battle you are fighting, back off, run away, live to fight another day. You will get more damage and kills and possibly be able to carry.

 

Your teammates will yell at you for abandoning them. They will call you nasty names. Don’t listen to them. You do you. You can win this match, they can’t.

 

A big part of this factor is not going to positions where you cannot run away. There are a number of spots that are popular for certain tank types which, if things do not go as you had planned, there is no escape from. Do not go to these spots unless you are very confident that you can win with your current level of support.

 

Stay alive longer. Win more matches. Simple.

 

Conclusion:

 

There are many other factors which influence matches, but let me tell you this: very rarely in my experience is the outcome of the match out of your control. Every time I lose I can identify several mistakes that I made which may have cost me the match.

 

Being a better player isn’t about not making mistakes, it’s about making fewer, less costly mistakes over time as you learn.

 

These are my two cents. Thanks for reading, and never stop learning and getting better my fellow tankers.

 

 

 

 

What resources on the web would you recommend to a nub to get general info on basic map placement?

 

o7

 

woobycat

 

What resources on the web would you recommend to a nub to get general info on basic map placement?

 

o7

 

woobycat

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3 hours ago, woobycat said:

 

What resources on the web would you recommend to a nub to get general info on basic map placement?

 

o7

 

woobycat

I don't know of any off the top my head. I learned good spots from watching players better than me on stream or in game and by experimentation.

Perhaps someone else can assist?

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On ‎4‎/‎11‎/‎2016 at 7:49 AM, nemlengyel said:

"Let's not bulli Lunas graphics" - warned Kolni in the thread!

Ha.....I think he is running a Pentium 133  

Just now, woobycat said:

Ha.....I think he is running a Pentium 133  

Not there is anything wrong with that,,,,lol

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Nice write-up. I would have commented earlier but I forgot to read this sub-forum lately.

There's one thing you don't mention that I learned to do over my solopub career : pub whispering.

I don't necessarily do it every game, but there are often situations where a good use of the in-game "Help me" and "Follow me" commands along with 2-3 well placed pings on the map will get your herd of pubbies deploying how you want them.

Or for example on Ruinberg encounter, I will gently remind them that it's encounter and that it will be important to control the field during the countdown. In fact every time it's encounter, it's probably a good idea to chime in during countdown and remind them what game mode they're playing. Little things like that can can seem futile in the grand scheme of things that is the unicum level of play, but if it gets the pubbies moving the right way and doing the right thing once in a hundred games, it's going to turn into an extra win at some point.

This can sometimes backfire however, creating 15-man lemming trains of pubbies who all flock to the grid square I pinged during countdown.

I can't prove it, but my gut feeling is that it gets more and more potent as your stats rise, and xvm-using pubbies become more inclined to follow your lead.

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I definitely tend to "hero" and then end up "getting stuck". I'll go where we're weakest and then try to adapt to the supposed role of the tank I'm driving. I'll sit there and pester, etc. until I'm surrounded.  I need to stop that. Thanks.

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Very good write up, thanks.

I do have a question for anyone who'd like to chime in, and it's related to the OP post. How do you deal with a pub battle where a whole flank is ignored? Even with gentle reminders and pings. Such as Sigfried line and no one goes or covers the field. Or Lakeville and no one goes to or covers the city. I've tried following the lemming trail but split between the lake road and the valley it never works. And covering the city yourself and then asking for help again doesn't work. just looking for the best answer as that seems to be happening a lot as of late.

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On 11.7.2016 at 0:52 AM, WIKD said:

I do have a question for anyone who'd like to chime in, and it's related to the OP post. How do you deal with a pub battle where a whole flank is ignored?

I think the best is to go with the lemming train and force a push. In some cases, you are completely screwed (the lakeville example you mentioned), but in many you might be able to snag a cap win. If you are in a fast tank, you can force a push, break a flank, and then come back and def base, and hope that your pubbies will cap for win, or in some cases, you smashed the flank you lemminged to so hard, that the rest will be just a mop-up.

 

In some cases, that will be autoloss (lakeville valley, overlord beach push, 99% of the abbey 8-9 line push, erlenberg crossing the bridge push etc.), and in those cases just farm as much dmg as you can. Try to pull out of the mach as much as possible for yourself, even though you will lose eventually.

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