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evacmybore

What is the particular use for T1-4 play?

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I had a comment come in that I've played almost zero T1-2, and very little T3-4.  (Like 62, 84, 200, 320 games in 1-4, 6300 overall.)

 

They said it was a huge educational error, and a huge drag in stats, not to play the low tiers.  Is this BS?  

 

What critical lessons will I learn in T1-2 that I don't in T6-7?

 

 

 

 

(FYI, I think seal clubbing is silly....)

 

 

 

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There are things that can be learned at those tiers, but honestly, I think that 5 is the best "teaching" tier, in that most of the things you'll need to learn in the game are there at 5.

 

Need to learn how to angle armor? Play a KV

Need to learn how to weakpoint? You'll see plenty of enemy heavies.

Need to learn how to use the spotting system? Run a Stug or T49.

 

There are a few things in the high tiers you don't really see in the mid tiers (such as high numbers of autoloaders), but Tier 5 is a good place to start filling in all the gaps in your game.  Then you can work up the foodchain from there, because once you've got those basics down, it's time to move up to better competition, and a more complex threat environment.

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I had a comment come in that I've played almost zero T1-2, and very little T3-4.  (Like 62, 84, 200, 320 games in 1-4, 6300 overall.)

 

They said it was a huge educational error, and a huge drag in stats, not to play the low tiers.  Is this BS?  

 

What critical lessons will I learn in T1-2 that I don't in T6-7?

 

 

 

 

(FYI, I think seal clubbing is silly....)

 

Practice in tier 1 and tier 2 will be better practice for T8 to X than actually practising in 8 to X?

 

Whoever told you that was an idiot.

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Tier 1-4 is only good for sealclubbing, and perhaps training a crew for some tier 3-4 tourney tanks. Nothing more. I agree with enaris, tier 5 s where it starts to get interesting.

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What Praetor said, tiers 1-4 don't really teach you anything that will be useful in high tiers.

 

The real game starts at tier 5/6, which is when tanks become more defined into their roles and also become better balanced, as well as players are not being so gimped with bad crews.

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The only thing I can possible glean from tier 1-4 is map familiarity. Even then, the view range and accuracy of the higher tiers makes those lessons negligible. 

 

That being said, you can still work on things like spotting mechanics, staying hidden, and shooting from outside of view range whilst inside draw range. 

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Basic UI skills

Basic Map familiarity

Basic Spotting mechanics (Province)

 

Other then that?  I think the biggest thing that tier will teach you is garage management.  How to repair, reload the tanks, how to work the XP system and module research and the concepts behind different gun configurations (Howitzer vs autoloader) 

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Draw range testing, bush spotting experiments, scout testing, and sometimes you just want to get that mission completed when the high tier teams just won't cooperate. You also get unique weapons you can't find at high tiers (15 mm, Bofors, 37 mm automatic, Little John), and low tiers are the last refuge of ugly tanks in a world overrun by T-54 clones (Vickers Medium Mk II, M2 Medium).

 

On the other hand, I'm usually tearing my hair out after a couple games down there, so it usually takes a string of really bad upper-tier teams to make me bring out the small stuff.

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For me, a normal/bad player, I have really taken a step back in tiers to work on fundamentals I have gleaned on this site. As I have been able to apply these lessons better an better, all of my stats have gone up. Currently, I am relatively happy with my play up to tier five(in the tank I play) and I am working on achieving those same results in my t6 tank. Hopefully, by the time I slow grind the research for the T71 I will be ready to play it.

Another good example would be my wrestling days. When I first started, I would practice againt the best wrestlers I could find. However, I did not enter the same wrestling class as them when I competed. That is, not until my level of play had reached a certain point where I could be competetive and not just a road hump to the others guys.

Since I dont play in CW or tourneys, pubbing is my competition and reading/researching is my practice. Therefore, I need to compete at a level that is that is conducive to me being able to make a difference in the battle, applying what I've learned here, and having fun. As my abilities improve so too will the tier I play go up.

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practising at tier 1-4 makes no sense.

 

Professional athletes don't practise against teenagers in gym class for a reason, it's useless.

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I think we often underestimate the importance of knowing the maps in this game. Low tiers are the best way to learn the maps because you can yolo all over the place without getting hammered.

 

Most of the basics are what you learn at low tiers, you just can't get comfortable with sitting in a bush with binocs and camo net and expecting wins once you move up. Well, except at tier 9-10 again.

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I think we often underestimate the importance of knowing the maps in this game. Low tiers are the best way to learn the maps because you can yolo all over the place without getting hammered.

 

Most of the basics are what you learn at low tiers, you just can't get comfortable with sitting in a bush with binocs and camo net and expecting wins once you move up. Well, except at tier 9-10 again.

 

The maps are very different at low tiers though. You can hide your enitre tank behind a grain of sand on the road, and sightlines are completely different because of viewrange limitations.

 

The advanced map knowledge that goes beyond just completely basic map layout is something that you can't easily extrapolate form tier 1 play

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For me, the best way to learn this game is to do medium tank company's.  I have learned so much playing them.  I have my first t8 and find its like starting all over again.

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Really?  Med TC's are that educational?

 

Hmm..  Never had a "TC worthy" tank, and the couple times I tried to enter you just......................sit...............................around................................................................and..........................get kicked.

 

(I don't have the time to sit for 20-30 min to play one match)

 

What's so good about them?

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practising at tier 1-4 makes no sense.

 

Professional athletes don't practise against teenagers in gym class for a reason, it's useless.

 

They don't practice against all-stars either. You do want to practice new skills against opponents that are not as good as you. Yes, at some point, it will not make sense for me to play lower tiers. As of right now 4,5,6s are good for me.

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Also lower tier games are faster --> you can learn faster and try more things that would be probably more expensive at higher tiers. But real game starts at tier 5.

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Well, as a cushion. Imagine seeing this game for the first time ever; barely able to drive with WASD; trying to learn to aim and shoot. Tier 5 is good for learning once you know the bare basics, but it'd be a horrible tier to start at. Now if everyone started at tier 5 that's different. There's nothing stopping the devs to make the tier 5 tanks "tier 1" and have everyone start there, but I suppose they wanted to include the very old tanks right at the start of tank age. These tanks suck but they were part of tank history so it makes sense including them in the game even tho they suck.

If we're talking about starting at the current tier 5 with current game structure, you won't "miss" much, assume you haven't rage quit yet. Take WoWP for example, it's like my first ever flying game, so derping around at low tier helped me get use to the interface and control. Had I started at tier 5, I'd just keep dying over and over and probably would have quit. Every game has that tutorial level at the start, boring mission that gets you used to the control that bares no value repeating.

It's hard to remember what it's like starting new, but I remember being on Mines and not knowing that there are grounds above the base of the hill. My friend told me to go up to the hill and I was like "what hill?".

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Tier 1-4: seal clubbing or tourney crew training

tier 5: seal clubbing

tier 6: also seal clubbing

Tier 7: padding

Tier 8-10: Where is starts requiring lots of skill to win 70+% of the time.

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I'm guessing that whoever told the OP that was referring to all the noobs who skip past the lower tiers as fast as possible, either by buying free exp or buying higher tier premium tanks.   If you don't understand the battle mechanics, tactics, and key areas on the maps you will fail a lot harder in mid/high tiers than you will in lower tiers.   That's pretty obvious but eager beaver noobs are often in denial about it.   If you're already past that point there is no need to go back whether you skipped it or not.

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Well, as a cushion. Imagine seeing this game for the first time ever; barely able to drive with WASD; trying to learn to aim and shoot. Tier 5 is good for learning once you know the bare basics, but it'd be a horrible tier to start at. Now if everyone started at tier 5 that's different. There's nothing stopping the devs to make the tier 5 tanks "tier 1" and have everyone start there, but I suppose they wanted to include the very old tanks right at the start of tank age. These tanks suck but they were part of tank history so it makes sense including them in the game even tho they suck.

If we're talking about starting at the current tier 5 with current game structure, you won't "miss" much, assume you haven't rage quit yet. Take WoWP for example, it's like my first ever flying game, so derping around at low tier helped me get use to the interface and control. Had I started at tier 5, I'd just keep dying over and over and probably would have quit. Every game has that tutorial level at the start, boring mission that gets you used to the control that bares no value repeating.

It's hard to remember what it's like starting new, but I remember being on Mines and not knowing that there are grounds above the base of the hill. My friend told me to go up to the hill and I was like "what hill?".

Tiers 1-5 are slowly introducing you to the game. Tier 1 can be picked up by your standard FPS user and they'll figure it out. Point, shoot, kill. Takes a while to kill, you learn core things- dispersion, sniper mode. The games very overwhelming at the start though, so they feed these things to you.

Armour as a mechanic doesnt really appear until Tier 5, but it slowly becomes evident. Tier 2 gives you normal tanks, TDs and arty. Theres no turreted TDs at this tier, for good reason (makes the TD role evident).

HP slowly scales and by Tier 3 and 4 you can see how little HP TDs have compared to their peers. Medium tanks appear, bigger guns on faster tanks. Modules and fires become more evident, auto cannons (which are kinda like an FPS assault rifle, idk why they're in but meh) get replaced with single shots, etc.

And all the while, you're playing very few battles and getting to elite -> next tank very quickly. The game addicts you with shiny and cool looking tanks and a rapid unlock system. You should have no intent of putting gold in yet, but someone fall in love and throw money at WG. By Tier 5, you're noticing credits- and how much you need. But up until Tier 5, the length of the grind is typically the amount of time you need to get the needed credits.

Tier 5 throws spotting mechanics at you, and armour, and suddenly the games looking a lot bigger.

Theres a bit more to it than that, but thats the gist. You learn to crawl and then walk in the lower tiers. Most pubbies never learn how to run, but I digress.

But besides teaching you basic skills, what does Tier 1-4 show an experienced high tier player?

Uh, camping at base and shooting useless numpties? The advantage of having a 4 skill crew and equipment against people with neither? How to play without long range artillery?

All crucial skills, mmm, yeah.

Seriously, the only low tier tank thats actually useful is probably a Pz II G, the tank with a 19 something second reload with a clip that mauls, but doesnt usually clip, same tier enemies. Its okay autoloader practice, same concept. But you're better off practicing in a 50 100 or a 12T/13 75.

Whoever told you that was probably a sealclubber trying to make it sound like they were doing something intelligent in the bottom tiers.

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I'm guessing that whoever told the OP that was referring to all the noobs who skip past the lower tiers as fast as possible, either by buying free exp or buying higher tier premium tanks.   If you don't understand the battle mechanics, tactics, and key areas on the maps you will fail a lot harder in mid/high tiers than you will in lower tiers.   That's pretty obvious but eager beaver noobs are often in denial about it.   If you're already past that point there is no need to go back whether you skipped it or not.

From my personal experience, I think it can go both ways.

I can see the benefit of playing low tiers for a new player, as the gameplay is more forgiving...

But since when is "easy" a good way to learn?

I think World of Tanks gameplay is at its best in tier 8, 9 and especially 10.

Thus, one should logically expect the fastest way to get good at WoT would be to rush to tier 8-9-10 and stick to it.

However, once you are "good", a few matches in lower tiers every once and then might help consolidate basic concepts that could have been skipped, thus improving gameplay even more...

But I guess it depends on the player too.

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From my personal experience, I think it can go both ways.

I can see the benefit of playing low tiers for a new player, as the gameplay is more forgiving...

But since when is "easy" a good way to learn?

I think World of Tanks gameplay is at its best in tier 8, 9 and especially 10.

Thus, one should logically expect the fastest way to get good at WoT would be to rush to tier 8-9-10 and stick to it.

However, once you are "good", a few matches in lower tiers every once and then might help consolidate basic concepts that could have been skipped, thus improving gameplay even more...

But I guess it depends on the player too.

 

 

I don't think buying a T8 Prem and derping around in upper tiers is the best approach either.

 

I honestly think the best system for a new player is to... "play to 5, and then focus on 5-6 for a time while you learn the complexities of the game.  Once you've done that, then start working up, integrating further lessons and learning how to deal with the continually increasing threat environment".

 

As I said earlier in this thread, at 5, you begin to see most of the major aspects of the game.  Gun vs Armor, spotting and camouflage, the importance of mobility, and so forth.  So yes, to stop and integrate those lessons by focusing at 5-6 is a positive thing.  Notice though, I specifically say this is for a new player.  For an experienced player, the benefit of playing at 5-6 is more limited.  If there is a specific thing you want to work on, it can be done.  For instance, vehicles like the T49 or StuG are good for learning how to make the camo system your friend. (Though, there are risks in that too, since few vehicles at higher tiers are that stealthy.)

 

Always though, and this is a lesson I learned the hard way (and am still relearning).  You absolutely don't want to spend lots of times in low tiers, and even mid tiers are dangerous.  Go ahead, look at my stats.  Look at the absolutely insane number of games in the SU-76.  That was largely my intro to this game.  Pretty much all of those games were within the first year or so after release.  59% solo play in nearly 1000 games? I was hot stuff, right? Not really.  I truly did not realize the advantages that an uber-crew gave me, or that I was stomping new players with 55% crews.  I learned lots of lessons, and most of them wrong.  So, if the first year was spent learning all the lessons the SU-76 taught me... the next year was spent unlearning at least half of those lessons.  Crap I did at Tier 3 is a death sentence pretty much anywhere else.

 

Yes, I'm a slow learner, and have probably overplayed my T49, which is giving some of the same issues now.  Which is one reason that I only take it out on occasion, and only when I just flat want to have fun.

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I don't think buying a T8 Prem and derping around in upper tiers is the best approach either.

 

I agree completely.

 

However, I believe rushing to tier 8-9-10 is a good thing (meaning to grind one line up to tier 10 and not stall on any particular tier).

 

Now, I don't think this is easy. Players who do this will get their butt kicked over and over and over again... And this is precisely one of the best ways to learn something.

I think this approach is even better than to follow a "mentor" around. Yes, a mentor will help you get "better", faster. You'll learn special spots on maps, cool tricks with your tanks, and get much better stats much, much faster.

However, just like in school; doing your homework with a smart kid doesn't make you good.

Finding information on your own, failing again and again, trial and error, that's how you get good.

 

I believe stalling at any tier early on (any tier below 8) will exacerbate behavior that is good in low tiers, but not as much in higher tier and cause reactions such as, "What? I peaked out for ONE second and I'm dead? F**k this s**t!!!" when you finally hit higher tiers...

 

You want to be good at angling armor? Play a Maus. Want to be good with the vision/camo system? Play a Bat. Chat. 25t or an Obj 263. Want to be good at conserving ammo and shooting straight? Play a FV215b 183. Etc.

Any lesson you may slowly start learning in tier 5-6 will hit you like a brick wall at tier 10. You can half ass understand game mechanics in tier 5 and manage to get pretty good games. In tier 10, it's do or die.

 

As for tier 8 premiums, I don't think anyone should get them until they've actually played at tier 8 for a bit. Maybe even some tier 9.

 

The reason for this is a lot of those tanks are worse than their same tier counterparts and have very "unique" play style. You don't play a T34 like a T32, and you absolutely don't play a Löwe like a Tiger 2 or a VK 45.02 A.

However, when you start to understand tier 8+ gameplay, you quickly find out that tier 8 premium are awesome money makers... Not so much everything else (with exceptions, of course).

 

But then again, I think it depends on the player...

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